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Egypt

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing

All signs in and out of Egypt say the revolution will not be turning back.

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

By Kristen Gillespie

ARAB HUMOR

*All signs in and out of Egypt say the revolution will not be turning back. Rumors circulating all day in diplomatic and journalistic circles about a highly anticipated speech from President Hosni Mubarak, where the embattled leader may announce his resignation. Protesters, meanwhile, have been unleashing a very different kind of weapon: the Arab world's famously wicked sense of humor. Photographs and placards mercilessly mocking Mubarak and his government is yet another sign that what pro-democracy activists are calling "the wall of fear" has truly fallen.

*A member of the 61,000-strong facebook group "We are all Khaled Said" that is driving the youth-led protests in Egypt posted this picture

of two scuba divers holding up a sign reading, "The fish want the regime to resign."

*An email circulating features pictures of signs mocking President Hosni Mubarak. This one, referring to the leader's 30-year grip on power, reads: "The carpenters of Egypt want to know: what kind of glue are you using?"

*Another poster features hieroglyphics, with the corresponding Arabic letters underneath spelling out the word "L-E-A-V-E." Underneath is written:"Maybe in hieroglyphics you'll understand, Pharoah."

*An email being forwarded among Jordanians takes the names of popular American movies and television shows and comes up with their Jordanian equivalents:

"The Usual Suspects' becomes: "The Muslim Brotherhood"

"Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets' becomes: "Samir Rifai and the Lower Chamber of Parliament," a reference to the recently resigned prime minister whom protesters forced out of office.

"The Social Network" becomes: "The Tribe."

TWITTERING

*@naglarzk tweeted a comment from recently released Google executive Wael Ghonim: "President Mubarak is paying the price for his lack of interest in the youth movement and killing a large number of young people."

*On his own twitter feed, Ghonim paints the end he sees coming: "I feel that the pen is writing the last line and soon enough we will turn the page and draw our future with our own hands."

*@demaghmak sees another unlikely digital hero of the revolution: "After the Egyptian revolution, heads of state will roll out the red carpet to welcome Mark Zuckerberg as he arrives in their countries."

REALITY VIDEO

*An unnamed child in the Egyptian port city of Alexandria leads a protest: "Hosni Mubarak!" he shouts. "Down, down!" the crowd answers. "Prime Minister} Ahmed Shafiq!" "Down, down!" Other chants include, "revolution until victory" and "Good morning, Mubarak – this is your last day."

*In Tahrir Square, protests sang along with a musician… and the lyrics are simple: "We are all one, we all ask one thing: LEAVE LEAVE LEAVE!"

Feb. 10, 2011

photo credit: illustir

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Green Or Gone

Tracking The Asian Fishing "Armada" That Sucks Up Tons Of Seafood Off Argentina's Coast

A brightly-lit flotilla of fishing ships has reappeared in international waters off the southern coast of Argentina as it has annually in recent years for an "industrial harvest" of thousands of tons of fish and shellfish.

Photo of dozens of crab traps

An estimated 500 boats gather annually off the coast of Patagonia

Claudio Andrade

BUENOS AIRES — The 'floating city' of industrial fishing boats has returned, lighting up a long stretch of the South Pacific.

Recently visible off the coast of southern Argentina, aerial photographs showed the well-lit armada of some 500 vessels, parked 201 miles offshore from Comodoro Rivadavia in the province of Chubut. The fleet had arrived for its vast seasonal haul of sea 'products,' confirming its annual return to harvest squid, cod and shellfish on a scale that activists have called an environmental blitzkrieg.

In principle the ships are fishing just outside Argentina's exclusive Economic Zone, though it's widely known that this kind of apparent "industrial harvest" does not respect the territorial line, entering Argentine waters for one reason or another.

For some years now, activists and organizations like Greenpeace have repeatedly denounced industrial-style fishing as exhausting marine resources worldwide and badly affecting regional fauna, even if the fishing outfits technically manage to evade any crackdown by staying in or near international waters.

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