When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie

A R A B I C A ارابيكا

FREE CITY
Ahmed Durat, a member of Libya's National Transitional Council, is calling on all rebels to leave Tripoli and return to their hometowns now that the city has been liberated, Al Masry Al Youm reports. The council has the Libyan capital under control, Durat said.

SIN CITY
Kuwait police announced that a series of raids on apartments and "gambling dens' during the holy month of Ramadan netted 129 men and women involved in drugs, prostitution and homosexuality. Of the 82 men arrested, "some hold important positions," the Ministry of Interior noted without elaborating. Foreigners who were arrested during the vice raids will be immediately deported. Kuwaiti nationals looking to get out of jail will have to sign a pledge that they will not "frequent suspicious apartments." Cases of wine, illegal in Kuwait, were seized, and one raid on a villa turned up "two girls, three young men and two homosexuals."

SAUDI MAGIC, #1
Saudi officials have concluded that a car accident in the town of Hayl was caused by magic, Ajel news website is reporting. A car overturned while a man was driving with his family. There were injuries, but no fatalities. Police found pieces of human hair and fingernails wrapped in a handkerchief and hidden under one of the seats. Suspicion has fallen on the maid, who was with the family at the time of the accident. Police and officials in Saudi Arabia regularly attribute mishaps, mental illness, depression or other common conditions to the workings of black magic.

SAUDI MAGIC, #2
Also on Friday, Al-Sabq.org, a Saudi news website reported on a Saudi women experiencing "worsening health conditions' in the final days of Ramadan. She visited several doctors, who found nothing wrong with her. Her family suspected she was either under a spell or possessed. They called a well-known religious sheikh, who spoke to the genie possessing her. The genie told the sheikh that a spell had been cast on the women, and that it was hidden in her father-in-law's attic. Sure enough, the proof was there in a make-up box – a series of small knots indicating that black magic was at work. The box was inspected by a professional who breaks magic spells for a living. He concluded that the spell was intended to break up the wife and husband. "Sources' told the paper that the woman's brother-in-law, a wealthy man concerned for his brother, was responsible for the spell.

EGYPTIAN DEFENSE
Ten Kuwaiti lawyers have joined the defense team of deposed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. The lawyers will hold a press conference next week to explain their reasons for joining the defense team, which already has 1,700 lawyers on it. Mubarak's trial will resume on September 5th.

September 2, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Society

Colombia Celebrates Its Beloved Drug For The Ages, Coffee

This essential morning drink for millions worldwide was once considered an addictive menace, earning itself a ban on pain of death in the Islamic world.

Colombia's star product: coffee beans.

Julián López de Mesa Samudio

-Essay-

BOGOTÁ — October 1st is International Coffee Day. Recently it seems as if every day of the calendar year commemorates something — but for Colombia, coffee is indeed special.

For almost a century now we have largely tied our national destiny, culture and image abroad to this drink. Indeed it isn't just Colombia's star product, it became through the course of the 20th century the world's favorite beverage — and the most commonly used drug to boost work output.

Precisely for its stimulating qualities — and for being a mild drug — coffee was not always celebrated, and its history is peppered with the kinds of bans, restrictions and penalties imposed on the 'evil' drugs of today.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ