When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie


A R A B I C A ارابيكا

BATTLE OF TRIPOLI
Violent clashes continued on Wednesday in Muammar Gaddafi's last stronghold in the Libyan capital. Al Jazeera's correspondent in Tripoli reports that Gaddafi's headquarters in the Bab al-Aziziya district was hit by mortar shells fired from a nearby neighborhood. "There are snipers on the buildings in Bab al-Aziziya," said rebel commander Nouri Mohammed.

TANKS OF HOMS
The Syrian military campaign in the central city of Homs continues, with one resident filming a tank in the street from what looks like behind a tree. The person filming says it is Wednesday, and that the tank is on Zeer Street in Homs "firing randomly on people in the streets." Gunfire is heard in the background.

CURSED IN TALBISA
Here is a video also said to be taken on Wednesday in the town of Talbisa. What sounds like a young man curses the armed soldiers. "Fire, you motherf*#*er – I'll f*#K your sister," the person filming says, and shortly thereafter at :30, the soldiers in the armored vehicle open fire. The camera pans to enormous holes, 6-8 inches wide, shot into the boarded up stores on the street. The soldiers "are trying to break up demonstrations on UNESCO Street." But as the crackle of gunfire resounds, the chants of "Allahu Akhbar" from a nearby street grow even louder. At 1:39, the firing gets close to the young men filming and they begin running, cursing the soldiers. At 2:39, viewers can see quick glimpes of empty streets, with all the shops closed. As he is running away, the man filming says mockingly of the soldier firing, "he can't shoot because he's a motherf*#*er." As the firing stops, the camera, and the young man who is still filming, peers around a street corner. When no soldiers are seen, he slowly moves into the empty street, filming bullet holes and posters of men ("martyrs') who have been killed in the uprising. It is a first-person, visceral six-minute chronicle of war.

FRIDAY PLANS
The Syrian Facebook group is now billing itself as the "Syrian Revolution General Commission." Protests will continue this Friday, the group announced, calling it the "Friday of patience and resilience." The group now has more than 265,000 members in its Arabic version.

LEBANESE SEARCH?
The Lebanese Prime Minister told An-Nahar newspaper that his government is doing "everything it can" to find the four Hezbollah members convicted of assassinating former Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri in 2005. One of the indicted men gave an interview to Time Magazine last week in which he said that authorities "know where to find me if they wanted to."

August 24, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Searching For Marianna, A Pregnant Doctor From Mariupol Held Captive By The Russians

We’ve heard about the plight of the soldiers-turned-prisoners from Mariupol. Here are some traces of the disturbing fate of a young female doctor who’s been taken away.

A paper dove reads "Mariupol" at a shelter for displaced children in Uzhhorod, western Ukraine.

Paweł Smoleński

"Wait for me, because I will return…"

Marianna Mamonova wrote these words to her family, among the text messages and short phone calls that are the only remaining fragments used to piece together her recent past. We also have a photo of her, posted on Russian websites, where she looks into the lens, gaunt and exhausted, signed with a number like a concentration camp prisoner.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Until the Russian-Ukrainian war, Mamonova’s biography was available to anyone who wanted to know. She was born in 1991, studied at the Ternopil Medical University, and later at the Kyiv Military Academy. After completing her studies, she was sent to work in the coastal city of Berdiansk. Her mother says that this is where her daughter's dream came true: She’d always wanted to be a military doctor, and worked in Berdiansk for three years, receiving the rank of officer in the Ukrainian army.

Beginning in 2014, she’d worked stints as a front-line doctor in the Donbas region, and when Russia invaded Ukraine in February she went to war again. This time in Mariupol.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Stories from the best international journalists.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ