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ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What the Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

LIBYA: DANGER
With Libyan state television now off the air, a key indicator that the regime is about to fall, a spokesman for the rebels remains cautious. "As long as Gaddafi is free, danger remains," said Mohammed Abdul Rahman.

LIBYA: DAUGHTER
The network also reports the rebels as having freed "thousands of political prisoners." They entered the Tripoli home of Gaddafi's daughter, Aisha, but it is not clear whether she was home at the time or the residence was vacated.

LIBYA: INTELLIGENCE
The most feared man in any Arab government is the head of the intelligence apparatus, or the mukhabarat. Libya's director of intelligence, Abdullah al-Sanusi, has reportedly escaped to the south of the country. Minister of Finance Mohammed Howeej is said to have fled to the western mountains.

LIBYA: RUSSIA
Jordanian entrepreneur and Twitter pundit Samih Toukan tweeted that "Russian policy toward Libya was extremely stupid. Even from a national-interest standpoint, they have lost a shot at any potential future projects."

MEANWHILE IN SYRIA
Protesters in Syria are running with the pending collapse of the Gaddafi regime, shouting in the streets that Bashar Assad is next. Demonstrations are continuing across the country after President Assad appeared on state television to say that he is "not worried" about the unrest. This cartoon speaks for itself – Gaddafi is driving a beat-up car out of town, and Assad, loaded up with military medals and regalia, stands along the side of the road trying to hitch a ride with Gaddafi. Here, panic strikes at a purported Homs protest on August 22nd. Young men run through the streets, carrying bloody victims away from Tahrir Square in the central Syrian city.

AND IN EGYPT
Egypt's Al Shouruk newspaper report in a tweet that "the president and senior officials at the University of Cairo have resigned in preparation for the election of new leaders."


August 23, 2011

photo credit: illustir

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