When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

ARABICA - A Daily Shot Of What The Arab World is Saying/Hearing/Sharing
Kristen Gillespie


A R A B I C A
ارابيكا

PERSUASIVE BY DESIGN
*The Syrian Revolution Facebook group has a new logo, with a face split down the middle; half civilian and half clad in military gear. "We will not serve in an army that is killing us," the banner reads at the top. The design reflects the group's priority for the moment to encourage Syrian soldiers to desert. "We are the Hama of Syria, not the Hama of Assad," it reads below, a message reproduced in this piece of calligraphy art. The word "Assad" is printed on a drawing of a shoe, showing disrespect for the Syrian leader. The group's home page banner concludes with the message: "During the month of Ramadan, every day is a Friday."

HOMS TO DARAA
Despite massive military offensives in Hama and Deir a-Zor, protests appear to be continuing around the country. Though impossible to verify the dates and locations, this clip purports to be of a Sunday protest in Homs, this one from the largely Kurdish town of Qamshilu and this from Daraa, where the uprising began.

SYRIA V. SAUDI
The pro-government Syrian daily Al-Watn slammed Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah for criticizing state-sanctioned violence against civilians. The king's statements late Sunday appeared more like the transmission of American threats than a "brotherly message," the paper wrote. "There is evidence that proves Syrians are the victims of a conspiracy." Saudi Arabia and Kuwait have recalled their ambassadors to Syria, with both countries condemning the bloodshed.

TRIPOLI STRANGLED
The Iqtisadiya newspaper reports that "the siege of Tripoli is starting to strangle the city; power cuts are plaguing residents." Already facing a fuel crisis, power outages and limited water supplies are taking a toll on Tripoli's residents. The U.A.E. paper reports that citizens blame Gaddafi, the rebels and NATO for the stranglehold, calling the cuts a provocation to force them to rise up. Despite the blazing heat of the desert summer, Ahmad, interviewed by the paper at a vegetable market in Tripoli, said he could live without air conditioning, but not refrigeration. "Power outages sometimes last 24 hours," he said, rotting food reserves stored in freezers.

August 8, 2011

photo credit: illustir

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!

2022 Kharkiv Pride Parade

Laura Valentina Cortés Sierra, Sophia Constantino and Lila Paulou

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ