When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!
Germany

Anti-Wall Street Movement Ready To 'Occupy' Germany

Protests linked to America's “Occupy Wall Street” movement are scheduled to take place this weekend in several German cities. Are the bank-bashing demonstrations about to go global?

A protestor in New York City
A protestor in New York City

Worldcrunch *NEWSBITES

MUNICH -- For weeks in New York, the "Occupy Wall Street" movement has been protesting the power of the banks and social inequality. The movement has now gone European – in fact, global: on Saturday, Oct. 15, people in nearly 50 German cities and some 70 countries will gather to make their voices heard against the financial markets, "the system," and more.

On Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, blogs, groups like "Real Democracy Now," "Occupy," "We Are The 99%," "United for Global Change," and "Anonymous," are calling for Oct. 15 to be a day of world protest.

"We‘re part of an international democratic movement, it's a global thing," says Mike Nagler, a coordinator for "Attac Deutschland." "This concerns all of us. We all want more say. That's why we're giving people the chance to step up to the podium and speak -- so we can air different ways of doing things." Those "different ways' could include nationalizing all banks, stopping cuts to social benefits and more direct democracy, according to Nagler.

Another group protesting on Oct. 15 is "Occupy Frankfurt," which is affiliated with "Occupy Germany." At least 400 activists connected to the Frankfurt group and to "Attac Deutschland" are expected to march to the headquarters of the European Central Bank. Leftists, Greens and other political groups are also expected to join the protesters around the country.

But neither organizers nor authorities are venturing to say just how many people will show up. In Berlin, where protests are expected to be fairly substantial, the police say so far that 350 are expected at one demonstration, 1,000 at another. However, 12 protest groups are listed on Facebook under "Occupy Berlin."

As of Thursday, 100 people had registered to participate, and 2,500 had clicked "like." Protests are also expected in Hamburg and Munich. "We're not talking about mass demonstrations," says Nagler. "But we know for sure it won't be a flop."

Also unknown is if the demonstrations in Germany or elsewhere will turn into a sit-in protest action in the New York style. However, Frankfurt authorities say that one of the "Occupy Frankfurt" demonstrations is supposed to last "for an unspecified period of time" and that a handful of demonstrators intend to set up "two or three tents' across from the European Central Bank.

Read the full original article in German by Lydia Bentsche

Photo – NLNY

*Newsbites are digest items, not direct translations

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Ideas

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

American and Southwest Airlines have been refusing to allow Cubans on board flights if they've been blacklisted by the government in Havana.

How U.S. Airlines Are Doing Cuba's Dirty Work On American Soil

Boarding a plane in Camaguey, Cuba

Santiago Villa

On Sunday, American Airlines refused to let Cuban writer Carlos Manuel Álvarez board a Miami flight bound for Havana. It was at least the third time this year that a U.S. airline refused to let Cubans on board to return to their homeland after Havana circulated a government "blacklist" of critics of the regime. Clearly undemocratic and possibly illegal under U.S. law, the airlines want to make sure to cash in on a lucrative travel route, writes Colombian journalist Santiago Villa:

-OpEd-

Imagine for a moment that you left your home country years ago because you couldn't properly pursue your chosen career there. It wasn't easy, of course: Your profession is not just singularly demanding, but even at the top of the game you might not be assured a stable or sufficient income, and you've had to take on second jobs, working in bars and restaurants.

This chosen vocation is that of a writer or journalist, or perhaps an artist, which has kept you tied to your homeland, often the subject of your work, even if you don't live there anymore.

Since leaving, you've been back home several times, though not so much for work. Because if you did, you would be followed in cars and receive phone calls to let you know you are being watched.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest