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Geopolitics

Anarchists Claim Responsibility For Shooting Of Italian Nuclear Boss

CORRIERE DELLA SERA (Italy)

MILAN – An anarchist group claimed responsibility Friday for the recent shooting of a top Italian nuclear energy executive, calling the victim "one of the many sorcerers of the atom."

The Milan daily Corriere della Sera received a lengthy text by regular post from the "Olga cell" of the Federazione Anarchica Informale (Informal Anarchic Federation), boasting of its targeting of Ansaldo nuclear's CEO Roberto Adinolfi, who was shot and wounded in Genoa on Monday by an unknown assailant.

The message, which vowed to strike other targets linked to Ansaldo's industrial holding group Finmeccanica, cited comments Adinolfi made after the Japanese nuclear disaster in Fukushima in which he downplayed the environmental impact of the accident.

"We have crippled Roberto Adinolfi, one of the many sorcerers of the atom," the document reads. "Taking a gun, choosing and tracking the target, coordinating mind and hand, were a required passage."

Adinolfi was discharged Friday from a hospital in Genoa, leaving in a wheelchair.

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Geopolitics

Idlib Nightmare: How Syria's Lingering Civil War Is Blocking Earthquake Aid

Across the border from the epicenter in Turkey, the Syrian region of Idlib is home to millions of people displaced by the 12-year-long civil war. The victims there risk not getting assistance because of the interests of Syrian leader Bashar al-Assad, reminding the world of one of the great unresolved conflicts of our times.

Photo of Syrian civilians inspecting a destroyed residential building in Idlib after the earthquake

A destroyed residential building in Idlib after the earthquake

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

Faced with a disaster of the magnitude of the earthquakes that struck Turkey and Syria, one imagines a world mobilized to bring relief to the victims, where all barriers and borders disappear. Unfortunately, this is only an illusion in such a complex and scarred corner of the world.

Yes, there's been an instant international outpouring of countries offering assistance and rescue teams converging on the disaster zones affected by the earthquakes. It is a race against time to save lives.

But even in such dramatic circumstances, conflict, hatred and competing interests do not somehow vanish by magic.

Sometimes, victims of natural disasters face a double price. This is the case for the 4.5 million inhabitants of Idlib, a region located in northwestern Syria, which was directly hit by the earthquake. So far, the toll there has reached at least 900 people killed, thousands injured and countless others left homeless in the harsh winter.

The inhabitants of Idlib, two-thirds of whom are displaced from other regions of Syria, live in an area that is still beyond the control of Bashar al-Assad, and they've been 90% dependent on international aid... which has not been arriving.

To put maximum pressure on these millions of people, the Syrian government and its Russian ally have gradually restricted the ability to get humanitarian aid to them.

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