When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

LE JOURNAL DU MALI (Mali)

BAMAKO - Want to try and guess which part of the world has a projected growth rate of 6% for 2012? South Asia? South America? Wrong - It's Africa!

"Africa is on the brink of a major transformation," declares Elsie Kanza, World Economic Forum director for Africa.

So long associated only with misery and economic hopelessness, Africa is home to six of the world's 10 fastest growing economies, including Angola and the Republic of Congo.

The 22nd World Economic Forum gathering opens in the Ethiopian capital of Addis Ababa on Wednesday, with an unprecedented sense of optimism about the continent's economic potential. This year's theme is "Shaping Africa's Transformation" and will address three themes: Strengthening Africa's Leadership, Accelerating Investment in Frontier Markets and Scaling Innovation for Shared Opportunities.

"Experts, businessmen and regional opinion leaders will meet to discuss their experiences and ideas on how to transform Africa, how to bring change to a continent whose population is close to a billion people," reports the Journal du Mali. "African nations need to concentrate on developing investments in key sectors of the economy, frontier markets such as agriculture and energy."

Read the full article in French.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Economy

Abenomics Revisited: Why Japan Hasn't Attacked The Wealth Divide

Japanese Prime Minister Fumio Kishida promised to tackle wealth inequality and help struggling workers. But a year after he came to power, financial traders are once again the winners.

Japanese workers will still have to wait for the distribution of wealth promised by Prime Minister Fumio Kishida.

Yann Rousseau

-Analysis-

TOKYO — Panic on the Nikkei, the Japanese stock market. Almost a year ago, at the end of September 2021, traders went into a panic in Tokyo. On Sept. 29, Fumio Kishida had just won the general election for the country's main conservative party, the Liberal Democratic Party. He was about to be named Prime Minister, succeeding Yoshide Suga, who'd grown too unpopular in the polls.

Kishida had won through a rather original reform program, which was in stark contrast with years of conservative pro-market politics. In his speeches, he had promised to generate a “new capitalism”. A phrase that makes investors shudder.

While he did not completely renounce his predecessors’ strategy called “Abenomics” — named after free-market stalwart Shinzo Abe, who was killed last July — Kishida declared that the government needed to tackle the issue of the redistribution of wealth in the island nation.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ