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'A Tragedy For Cuba' - As Pope Arrives, Castro’s Exiled Daughter Speaks Out

Exclusive: Alina Fernandez doesn’t expect to ever again see – or even speak with – her famous father, Fidel Castro. As Pope Benedict XVI visits Cuba, Fernandez tells La Stampa that she doubts a late-in-life conversion for her father. "He assumes

Alina Fernandez, daughter of Fidel Castro and Natalia Revuelta (YouTube)
Alina Fernandez, daughter of Fidel Castro and Natalia Revuelta (YouTube)
Paolo Mastrolilli

NEW YORK -- Two decades after her sensational escape from Cuba, Alina Fernandez still sounds bitter when speaking about her famous father, Cuban dictator Fidel Castro. In her late 30s at the time, Fernandez fled the communist island nation in 1993 – wearing a wig and using a fake Spanish passport. She went to Madrid, and later to Miami. In Florida, her radio show, Simplemente Alina (Simply Alina), became a hit among the exiled Cuban community.

Mrs. Fernandez. Pope Benedict XVI's visit to Cuba is leading to rumors that Fidel Castro may convert. Do you think this is possible?
In the past, many blamed me for this rumor. But it was unfounded. And I would be the last one to know. It would be a beautiful thing if my father, who is sick and old, will go back to the roots of the faith in which he grew up, when he studied with the Jesuits. It will give him the human dignity that he lost. But I don't believe it. I think he assumes he's immortal.

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Mariateresa Fichele

Fifteen years ago, Francesco kept busy by scamming people. He was a regular visitor to the beaches of Terracina, south of Rome, where he was caught several times selling counterfeit Ray-Ban sunglasses. Then came the drugs, which fed a serious substance-induced psychosis and eventually he tested positive for HIV.

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