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Monday's edition of Die Tageszeitung features a front page that, at best, we can call overly creative. The Berlin daily's editors unlikely photoshopped mash-up is a blend of two big stories from over the weekend : the death Saturday of rock'n'roll legend Chuck Berry at the age of 90, and the unanimous selection Sunday of Martin Schulz to head the Social Democratic Party of Germany, ahead of September's election where he will challenge three-term incumbent Chancellor Angela Merkel.

Whether the bearded former head of the European Parliament can actually beat Merkel will be in the hands of German voters. But we can all agree that the singer of such classics as "Roll Over Beethoven" and "Johnny B. Goode" would be doing some rollin" over even before he's in his grave if he could see his signature duckwalk blasphemed by that photomontage.

See instead Rolling Stone magazine's coverage of Berry's death.

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Fading Flavor: Production Of Saffron Declines Sharply

Saffron is well-known for its flavor and its expense. But in Kashmir, one of the flew places it grows, cultivation has fallen dramatically thanks for climate change, industry, and farming methods.

Photo of women harvesting saffron in Kashmir

Harvesting of Saffron in Kashmir

Mubashir Naik

In northern India along the bustling Jammu-Srinagar national highway near Pampore — known as the saffron town of Kashmir —people are busy picking up saffron flowers to fill their wicker baskets.

During the autumn season, this is a common sight in the Valley as saffron harvesting is celebrated like a festival in Kashmir. The crop is harvested once a year from October 21 to mid-November.

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