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JAPAN TIMES, NHK (Japan), CNN (USA), BBC NEWS (UK)

Worldcrunch

TOKYO - A powerful earthquake struck off the northeast coast of Japan on Friday evening, triggering a tsunami, reports CNN.

The epicentre of the 7.3 magnitude quake was about 245km (150 miles) south-east of Kamiashi at a depth of about 36 kilometers.

There have been no immediate reports of deaths or injuries, reports The Japan Times.


Evacuations have been ordered in the affected coastal regions, according to BBC News.

Seismic activity could be felt in the capital city of Tokyo where buildings swayed for several minutes.

Very big shake in Tokyo

— Mark Willacy (@markwillacy) December 7, 2012

Still going

— Mark Willacy (@markwillacy) December 7, 2012

Still slight wobbling...long, long quake

— Mark Willacy (@markwillacy) December 7, 2012

Why is this #quake not stopping? #japan

— Toshio Suzuki 鈴木 ã�¨ã�—ã�Š (@ToshJohn) December 7, 2012

Tohoku, Joetsu and Nagano shinkansen high-speed trains have been stopped to conduct checks on the lines.

The Japan Meteorological Agency said a 1-meter high tsunami wave was recorded at 6:02 P.M. Japan Time in the Ayukawa District of Ishinomaki City, reports NHK.

Map of the quake epicentre - Source: CNN.com

Tohoku Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) said no abnormalities have so far been reported at its nearby nuclear plant in Onagawa.

This region was already the hardest hit by the devastating earthquake and tsunami that struck in March 2011 and killed more than 15,000 people.

NHK newscasters really went all-out this time in issuing #tsunami warnings: “Flee now to save your life!” “Remember the Tohoku disaster!"

— Hiroko Tabuchi (@HirokoTabuchi) December 7, 2012


Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda cancelled campaigning for the 16 December election to return to his office.

All tsunami advisories and warnings for north-east Japan have now been lifted after magnitude-7.3 earthquake this evening

— Mark Willacy (@markwillacy) December 7, 2012

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President Vladimir Putin will sign an agreement on the annexation of 18% of Ukrainian territories

Cameron Manley, Chloe Touchard, Sophia Constantino, and Emma Albright

Russian President Vladimir Putin will sign the annexation Friday of four occupied regions of Ukraine to become part of Russia, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov announced this morning.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

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The Kremlin will host a ceremony on Friday where agreements will be signed on the annexation of Luhansk, Donetsk, Kherson and Zaporizhzhia. Peskov said the ceremony would take place on Friday at 3 p.m. local time. Taken together the regions in the east and south make up 18% of Ukraine’s territory. The move follows the 2014 annexation of Crimea, which many consider the less violent pre-cursor to Russia's all-out invasion of Ukraine.

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