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Geopolitics

11 Most Popular Worldcrunch Articles Of 2017

11 Most Popular Worldcrunch Articles Of 2017

Venice For Sale? Historic Buildings Flipped Into Airbnbs​​

LA STAMPA


A Woman's Perspective On Divorce In The Arab World

More and more people in Muslim-majority countries are opting out of their marriages. And often it's the woman who decides to end things.

SÜDDEUTSCHE ZEITUNG


Obama's Shadow, White House photographer Pete Souza Looks Back

LE TEMPS


A Year After Cologne: The Quiet Submission Of German Women

What has Germany done to make people feel safer after the events of last New Year's Eve, when hundreds of women were sexually abused in Cologne and other cities? Not much, writes author Birgit Kelle.

DIE WELT


Globalization As Ideology Is Dead And Buried

Donald Trump is not the free market's executioner, but a coroner appointed to quietly confirm its demise. Sadly, in its place, is a gaping void of alternatives.

AMERICA ECONOMIA


In Beijing, Sham Marriages To Bypass Government Policies

"Goodbye," Ying told her third husband. "Oh," he responded.

ECONOMIC OBSERVER


Ochlocracy, The Ancient Greek Concept That Explains Our World Today

Some fear that democracy is deteriorating under the pressure of populism. There's a word in ancient Greek to describe this phenomenon: ochlocracy. It's no longer used. And yet, it deserves to be brought back in fashion.

LES ECHOS


Gérard Depardieu, The Impossible Interview

The legendary French actor just published a very personal book. So why is he so hard to talk to?

LE FIGARO


Welcome To "Cracolandia," São Paulo's Roving Drug Bazaar

A pulsing, hazy world comes to life every night in Brazil's largest city, as drug traffickers and users gather to buy, sell, barter, smoke. When police intervene, a new neighborhood is found.

FOLHA DE S. PAULO


Banksy In Bethlehem, Lessons For A Skeptical Israeli

It is precisely because I did not want to be a hypocrite that I had not visited the hotel. Who wants to be the Israeli who takes a happy selfie in front of testimony to the oppression to which he is a party?

CALCALIST


Aging Taiwan And The Doubts Of A Faraway Daughter

In a society where filial piety is regarded as the most fundamental family value, and where "Five generations under one roof" is esteemed as the ultimate happiness, Taiwan is changing fast.

RUE AMELOT

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Society

In Northern Kenya, Where Climate Change Is Measured In Starving Children

The worst drought in 40 years, which has deepened from the effects of climate change, is hitting the young the hardest around the Horn of Africa. A close-up look at the victims, and attempts to save lives and limit lasting effects on an already fragile region in Kenya.

Photo of five mothers holding their malnourished children

At feeding time, nurses and aides encourage mothers to socialize their children and stimulate them to eat.

Georgina Gustin

KAKUMA — The words "Stabilization Ward" are painted in uneven black letters above the entrance, but everyone in this massive refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, calls it ya maziwa: The place of milk.

Rescue workers and doctors, mothers and fathers, have carried hundreds of starving children through the doors of this one-room hospital wing, which is sometimes so crowded that babies and toddlers have to share beds. A pediatric unit is only a few steps away, but malnourished children don’t go there. They need special care, and even that doesn’t always save them.

In an office of the International Rescue Committee nearby, Vincent Opinya sits behind a desk with figures on dry-erase boards and a map of the camp on the walls around him. “We’ve lost 45 children this year due to malnutrition,” he says, juggling emergencies, phone calls, and texts. “We’re seeing a significant increase in malnutrition cases as a result of the drought — the worst we’ve faced in 40 years.”

From January to June, the ward experienced an 800 percent rise in admissions of children under 5 who needed treatment for malnourishment — a surge that aid groups blame mostly on a climate change-fueled drought that has turned the region into a parched barren.

Opinya, the nutrition manager for the IRC here, has had to rattle off these statistics many times, but the reality of the numbers is starting to crack his professional armor. “It’s a very sad situation,” he says, wearily. And he believes it will only get worse. A third year of drought is likely on the way.

More children may die. But millions will survive malnutrition and hunger only to live through a compromised future, researchers say. The longer-term health effects of this drought — weakened immune systems, developmental problems — will persist for a generation or more, with consequences that will cascade into communities and societies for decades.

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