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Geopolitics

Macron, Part Deux: France And The World React In 22 Front Pages

Newspapers in France and around the world are devoting their Monday front pages to Emmanuel Macron's reelection as French president.

Macron, Part Deux: France And The World React In 22 Front Pages

Emmanuel Macron won a second term as president of France, beating far-right leader Marine Le Pen by a wide 58.5-41.5% margin ... oui, mais.


Sunday's victory was less resounding than in 2017, when Macron (already head-to-head with Le Pen) became France's youngest ever elected president. His first term left France in a deeply fractured state, as many French international newspapers noted on Monday by highlighting the challenges ahead for Macron on their front pages:

FRANCE - Libération

Libération

FRANCE - Le Figaro

Le Figaro

FRANCE - Les Echos

Les Echos

FRANCE - Corse Matin

FRANCE - La Croix

La Croix

FRANCE - L'Humanité

L'Humanité

FRANCE - Sud Ouest

Sud Ouest

FRANCE - 20 Minutes

20 Minutes

FRANCE - L'Opinion

L'Opinion

FRANCE - Le Parisien

Le Parisien

FRANCE - Le Télégramme

Le Télégramme

UNITED KINGDOM - The Guardian

The Guardian

SPAIN - El Pais

El País

SWEDEN -Svenska Dagbladet

Svenska Dagbladet

POLAND - Gazeta Wyborcza

Gazeta Wyborcza

ISRAEL - Haaretz

Harretz

SAUDI ARABIA - Arab News

Arab News

ARGENTINA - Clarin

Clarín

CHILE - La Tercera

La Tercera

UNITED STATES - The Wall Street Journal

The Wall Street Journal

CANADA - National Post

National Post

CHINA - Global Times

Global Times

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Coronavirus

Chinese Students' "Absurd" Protest Against COVID Lockdowns: Public Crawling

While street demonstrations have spread in China to protest the strict Zero-COVID regulations, some Chinese university students have taken up public acts of crawling to show what extended harsh lockdowns are doing to their mental state.

​Screenshot of a video showing Chinese students crawling on a soccer pitch

Screenshot of a video showing Chinese students crawling

Shuyue Chen

Since last Friday, the world has watched a wave of street protests have taken place across China as frustration against extended lockdowns reached a boiling point. But even before protesters took to the streets, Chinese university students had begun a public demonstration that challenges and shames the state's zero-COVID rules in a different way: public displays of crawling, as a kind of absurdist expression of their repressed anger under three years of strict pandemic control.

Xin’s heart was beating fast as her knees reached the ground. It was her first time joining the strange scene at the university sports field, so she put on her hat and face mask to cover her identity.

Kneeling down, with her forearms supporting her body from the ground, Xin started crawling with three other girls as a group, within a larger demonstration of other small groups. As they crawled on, she felt the sense of fear and embarrassment start to disappear. It was replaced by a liberating sense of joy, which had been absent in her life as a university student in lockdown for so long.

Yes, crawling in public has become a popular activity among Chinese university students recently. There have been posters and videos of "volunteer crawling" across universities in China. At first, it was for the sake of "fun." Xin, like many who participated, thought it was a "cult-like ritual" in the beginning, but she changed her mind. "You don't care about anything when crawling, not thinking about the reason why, what the consequences are. You just enjoy it."

The reality out there for Chinese university students has been grim. For Xin, her university started daily COVID-19 testing in November, and deliveries, including food, are banned. Apart from the school gate, all exits have been padlock sealed.

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