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The Art Of Theft: Italian Man Chainsaws Drawing Off Museum Wall

Bansky would be proud ...

The Art Of Theft: Italian Man Chainsaws Drawing Off Museum Wall
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank

BOLOGNA — The bearded young visitor to Bologna's Modern Art Museum was not framed for the crime. Instead, the would-be chainsaw art collector was simply following the directions of Aldo Giannotti, the Italian-Austrian artist whose work he carved out of the museum's wall with the help of the electric lumberjack tool.

Underneath the drawing on the wall of a chainsaw, Giannotti's text was clear: "This drawing can be taken for free by a collector who shows up with a chainsaw and cuts out a piece of wall." Like Banksy's self-triggered shredded painting, it was the kind of art stunts that plays with questions of control, place and authorship.

The exhibit entitled "Safe & Sound" at the Museo d'Arte Moderna was built around the theme of exploring "actions that are not allowed in everyday life," reported La Repubblica. Other directives in the exhibit include: "Lie down in the middle of the museum space and contemplate the ceiling."

In a video of the incident, the "collector" can be seen cutting a neat rectangle around the drawing of a chainsaw as onlookers filmed with their phones. Giannotti shared the scene on Instagram, writing, "In Bologna they used to cut murals from city walls to bring them inside museums. Yesterday we cut them out of museums to bring them out."

One question that neither artist or museum has answered is about security: who checked the anonymous collector — both when he entered and exited?

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Geopolitics

Minerals And Violence: A Papal Condemnation Of African Exploitation, Circa 2023

Before heading to South Sudan to continue his highly anticipated trip to Africa, the pontiff was in the Democratic Republic of Congo where he delivered a powerful speech, in a country where 40 million Catholics live.

Minerals And Violence: A Papal Condemnation Of African Exploitation, Circa 2023
Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — You may know the famous Joseph Stalin quote: “The Pope? How many divisions has he got?” Pope Francis still has no military divisions to his name, but he uses his voice, and he does so wisely — sometimes speaking up when no one else would dare.

In the Democratic Republic of Congo (the former Belgian Congo, a region plundered and martyred, before and after its independence in 1960), Francis has chosen to speak loudly. Congo is a country with 110 million inhabitants, immensely rich in minerals, but populated by poor people and victims of brutal wars.

That land is essential to the planetary ecosystem, and yet for too long, the world has not seen it for its true value.

The words of this 86-year-old pope, who now moves around in a wheelchair, deserve our attention. He undoubtedly said what a billion Africans are thinking: "Hands off the Democratic Republic of the Congo! Hands off Africa! Stop choking Africa: It is not a mine to be stripped or a terrain to be plundered!"

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