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Shaun Lavelle

See more by Shaun Lavelle

Massive New 600 Billion Euro Estimate Of War Damage, EU Says Russia Will Pay
In The News

Massive New 600 Billion Euro Estimate Of War Damage, EU Says Russia Will Pay

The European Union is committed to setting up a special court with the backing of the UN to investigate and prosecute Russian war crimes in Ukraine, and force Russia and its oligarchs to pay the growing pricetag for the destruction of the country.

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European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen promised in a video statement that “Russia’s horrific crimes will not go unpunished.” She said that it was estimated so far that 20,000 Ukrainian civilians and 100,000 Ukrainian military officers had been killed so far.

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War In Ukraine, Day 275: Zelensky Says "No Schism," Trying To Keep West United At Key Juncture
In The News

War In Ukraine, Day 275: Zelensky Says "No Schism," Trying To Keep West United At Key Juncture

Fears of European discord over energy prices, as Ukraine is facing what the UN calls "appalling conditions of life" amid Russia's onslaught timed with the arrival of winter.

Ukrainian President Volodymr Zelensky declared Friday that Europe remains unified in its support for Ukraine in the face of Russian aggression. In a virtual address to “The Idea of Europe” conference in Lithuania, Zelensky said “There is no split. There is no schism among Europeans. We have to preserve this so this is our mission number one this year.”

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Zelensky made the case that both Europe and Ukraine are suffering from Russia’s military aggression and manipulation of energy markets.

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Photo of participants at the The 15th edition of the Santiago Parade, March for Equality
LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ International: World Cup Armband Mess, Russian Bans, Santiago Pride

Welcome to our new exclusive weekly round up of LGBTQ+ news from around the world.

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

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Macron Calls Putin’s Airstrikes On Civilian Infrastructure A War Crime
In The News

Macron Calls Putin’s Airstrikes On Civilian Infrastructure A War Crime

The French President leads a growing chorus of outrage against Russia, including the strongest condemnation to date from Pope Francis.

French President Emmanuel Macron on Thursday led a rising chorus of outrage after unprecedented Russian air attacks on civilian infrastructure targets, which left up to 75% of Kyiv residents without power and water, and killed 10 people across Ukraine.

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“Strikes against civilian infrastructures are war crimes and cannot go unpunished,” Macron said.

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War In Ukraine, Day 265: NATO Escalation Averted After Poland Confirms Missile Strike Was Accident
In The News

War In Ukraine, Day 265: NATO Escalation Averted After Poland Confirms Missile Strike Was Accident

Warsaw saysthat the missile that hit Poland was probably a Ukrainian air defense missile that went astray. The Russian-made missile fell on thePolish village of Przewodów, near the border with Ukraine, killing two people late Tuesday.

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Even though the missile was made in Russia,initial US assessments indicated that it had originated in Ukraine.

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Photo of participants flying a rainbow flag at the Buenos Aires Pride on Nov. 5
LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ International: World Cup Pressure, Buenos Aires Pride — And The Week’s Other Top News

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

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Brittney Griner’s Whereabouts Unknown
In The News

Brittney Griner’s Whereabouts Unknown

Representatives for U.S. basketball star Brittney Griner, detained in Russia since February, have confirmed they do not know her current whereabouts. This comes after her attorneys said the courts had ordered her transferred to a Russian penal colony on Wednesday.

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“Our primary concern continues to be Brittney Griner’s health and well-being,” the WNBA player’s agent Lindsay Colas said in a statement. “As we work through this very difficult phase of not knowing exactly where she is or how she is doing, we ask for the public’s support in continuing to write letters and express their love and care for her.”

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U.S. Warns About Putin’s Dangerous Doublespeak On Nuclear Threat
In The News

U.S. Warns About Putin’s Dangerous Doublespeak On Nuclear Threat

Vladimir Putin told the world yesterday "don't worry" about a nuclear attack, even as he's setting up a scenario that makes it more likely.

Vladimir Putin used his wide-ranging foreign policy speech Thursday to strike an overall threatening tone toward Ukraine and its Western partners, including a warning that the coming decade would be the “most dangerous and unpredictable” since World War II.

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Putin did, however, try to allay one specific fear: that he might choose to use nuclear arms in the war in Ukraine. Putin said Russia “had never talked about using nuclear weapons" and that using them “made no political or military sense.”

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photo of protests holding a banner to stop fossil fuel
Green

Why The Netherlands' Exit From An Obscure Energy Treaty Is Such Big News For The Climate

The little-known Energy Charter Treaty protects oil and gas firms from regulation that harms their interests. The Dutch government has pulled out, and now the rest of Europe may follow.

AMSTERDAM — For many, the big climate story of the week was the two young activists who tossed tomato soup on a Van Gogh painting in London. But the real story with lasting impact was unfolding in the Netherlands, which announced on Tuesday that it intends to withdraw from the “Energy Charter Treaty” (ECT).

Environment policy experts say the Dutch exit — with Spain and Poland poised to leave — could set in motion the complete collapse of this little-known pact.

Climate activists were jubilant. Dutch politician Christine Teunissen of the Party of the Animals described it as a “huge win”. Just last week, Greta Thunberg announced that five young victims of the climate crisis were taking action against the ECT at Europe’s top human rights court.

But outside climate circles, few had even heard of a treaty that brought risks of leaving governments open to billion-dollar lawsuits by fossil fuel companies.

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Russia Evacuates Kherson — What It Says About Kyiv's Counteroffensive
In The News

Russia Evacuates Kherson — What It Says About Kyiv's Counteroffensive

The southern city, which fell to Moscow's forces in the first days of the war, could become the clearest symbol of the success of Ukraine's autumn drive to retake territory.

"Dear residents! Ukrainian army will be shelling residential areas…" Such read the message early Wednesday from Kirill Stremousov, deputy head of the Russian occupation administration of the Kherson region, calling for the evacuation of up to 60,000 people.

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Stremousov’s evacuation orders is an acknowledgement of the ongoing loss of territory of pro-Russian forces in the southern region, following a similar announcement Tuesday by the new commander of Russian troops in Ukraine, General Sergey Surovikin, who warned that Kyiv was taking aim at the region’s nearby hydroelectric power plant.

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Russia Also Takes Aim At Civilians Indirectly, 30% Of Power Stations Destroyed
In The News

Russia Also Takes Aim At Civilians Indirectly, 30% Of Power Stations Destroyed

Blackouts and water shortages will cause major suffering, especially as winter arrives.

Russian attacks have continued into Tuesday on Ukraine’s energy and water facilities. Parts of Kyiv and other cities were left without power and water. In a video released on Twitter, Ukrainian President Volodymr Zelensky said that 30% of Ukraine’s power stations had been destroyed in the past eight days, causing massive blackouts across the country.

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Zelensky noted that Moscow was continuing to target civilians both directly and indirectly through air strikes aimed at energy supplies as winter approaches. It’s “another kind of Russian terrorist attacks: targeting energy & critical infrastructure,” the Ukrainian president said.

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Photo of the crown resting atop Queen Elizabeth II's coffin as it is carried during a Ceremonial Procession ​in London on Sept. 14
Society

The Queen’s Death Is The Perfect Time To Talk About What's Wrong With The Monarchy

Not everyone in Britain is mourning the death of the Queen. There is increasing concern about how the monarch's death is being used to repress freedom of expression and protest.

-Analysis-

The main thing I remember from Princess Diana’s funeral is how fast the hearse drove.

I was 11, perched on a relative’s shoulders to see over the crowd, expecting the arrival of a solemn procession. But this was the M1 motorway, heading out of London, 100 kilometers still to reach Althorp, Diana’s final resting place. So the motorcade was going full speed — and I only caught a glimpse.

But I also remember all the people lining the M1, and cars stopped on the opposite side of the motorway. The country — and yes, the world — literally came to a standstill. More than 31 million people in the UK watched the Westminster Abbey funeral on television (1 in every 2 people), and an estimated 2.5 billion worldwide.

Fast-forward 25 years. Following British media from afar, you’d be forgiven for thinking the same outpouring of grief is happening for Queen Elizabeth II. Yes, more than a million people have queued up for miles to see the Queen lying in state. Yes, the end of her long reign is cause for plenty of reflection and nostalgia. Yet despite what the blanket media coverage would want you to believe, public sentiment is not as universal this time around. And that's Ok.

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