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Ece Yavuz

See more by Ece Yavuz

From Ecuador to Singapore, cameras are watching
Society

Take 5: How China's Big Brother Inspires Surveillance Tech Around The World

Personal privacy seems to be fleeting in a world where technology is constantly advancing — and it's no accident: Around the globe, authorities are creating new ways to collect information about their citizens, be it in the streets or in supermarkets.

Identity verification is a growing business, and the market is expected to grow from $6 billion to $12.8 billion by 2024. China is clearly leading in this domain, using identity verification to record even minor infractions like jaywalking.

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Time to change the country's current insensitivity to ordinary people?
Turkey

Turkey, Time For A Truly Democratic Constitution

Ekrem Imamoglu's victory in the recent rerun election in Istanbul was a breath of fresh air for Turkish democracy. But to really recover lost ground, the country needs a new set of rules, writes Yakup Kepenek.

-OpEd-

ISTANBUL — It has now been nine years since a new regime was initiated with the constitutional law change of Sept. 12, 2010, and every day since, Turkey has been struggling to earn back its freedom. For a swift recovery, it's now time for certain basic laws of the constitution to be revisited.

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Imamoglu supporters in Istanbul on June 21
Turkey

Istanbul's Opposition Mayor And Hopes For Turkish Democracy

For the first time in 25 years, the party of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan will not be running Turkey's biggest city. With his​ landmark victory in Sunday's election rerun, Ekrem Imamoglu will be the new mayor of Istanbul, with significance that reaches well beyond the city's 15 million residents. Imamoglu, who won easily 54% to 45%, had already narrowly beaten the ruling party's candidate, former Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yildirim. But Erdogan's Justice and Development Party, AKP, challenged the election for alleged voting irregularities. The voided vote put into question the very standing of Turkish democracy and whether Erdogan's party, which has governed Turkey since 2002, would accept any major defeat at the polls.

-Essay-

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