Clare Rayner

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Watch: OneShot - 10 Years Ago, Breastfeeding In Afghanistan
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Watch: OneShot - 10 Years Ago, Breastfeeding In Afghanistan

The pure beauty of Siamoy breastfeeding her month-old baby Hokim, in this image taken exactly 10 years ago, powerfully contrasts with a grim reality on the ground. NOOR photographer Alixandra Fazzina had traveled to the remote Afghan province of Badakshan because it had the highest rate of maternal mortality in the world. Capturing this angelic scene shone a light on the dire need to care for mothers and children around the world.

Fazzina told The Guardian: "I took about 10 frames of Siamoy. People say this image looks religious, kind of iconic, like a Madonna and child, but I've never seen that. I think it's something more simple: there is a beauty to Siamoy, a power and serenity showing something dignified about motherhood."

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Watch: OneShot - Farewell To Aretha Franklin
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Watch: OneShot - Farewell To Aretha Franklin

Aretha Franklin, the undisputed Queen of Soul, died on Thursday at the age of 76. All kinds of Respect in this time of mourning for the music world. Here she was performing in Rome back in 1968, at her peak — even if she never really came down.

Aretha Franklin 1942-2018 — Photo: Globe/ZUMA

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Watch: OneShot - The Queen Of Pop Turns 60
Italy

Watch: OneShot - The Queen Of Pop Turns 60

She is in the Guinness World Records as the best-selling recording artist of all time. Sometimes referred to as the Queen of Pop, and cited as an inspiration for generations of performing artists, Madonna is quite simply a musical legend. She is also a role model for modern women in all walks of life, having asserted artistic and financial control over her work. Now, the woman born Madonna Louise Ciccone in Bay City, Michigan has truly reached her prime at 60... Happy Birthday Madonna!

Madonna at Madison Square Garden. Nov. 13, 2012. — ©John Barrett/Globe Photos/ZUMA / OneShot

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Watch: OneShot — On Revolution Road
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Watch: OneShot — On Revolution Road

During the 2011 war in Libya, NOOR photographer Yuri Kozyrev wound up in the wrong place at the right time. His image of the moment a rebel position was targeted by a missile attack, on March 11, 2011 in the oil-refining town of Ras Lanuf, would win the World Press Photo first prize in Spot News, singles category.

On Revolution Road — ©Yuri Kozyrev/NOOR / OneShot

From World Press Photo:

The uprising against the regime of Colonel Muammar Gaddafi had grown out of clashes with authorities in the east-Libyan city of Benghazi, in mid-February. Anti-Gaddafi sentiment was strongest in the east of the country, and Benghazi came to be seen as the rebel stronghold. Ras Lanuf had fallen to anti-government forces on 4 March, during their initial advance west, towards the capital Tripoli. After heavy bombardment by land, sea and air, Gaddafi's forces retook the city on 10 March, and began pushing the rebels back. For some days it appeared that even Benghazi would be retaken. Gaddafi's counter-advance was halted after NATO planes began bombing Libyan military targets, following a UN resolution on 17 March. Rebel forces began moving west again and by the end of the month had recaptured Ras Lanuf, though they would not permanently occupy the city until late August. ​

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Watch: OneShot — Blinded In The City Of Lights
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Watch: OneShot — Blinded In The City Of Lights

Désolé, France is not on the trajectory of the partial solar eclipse taking place this Saturday (Aug. 11). About a century ago, Parisians were luckier: The total eclipse of April 17, 1912 brought them out to the streets in droves. The spectacle was front-page news in the country — alongside early reports of a certain maritime disaster, that happened just two days before this picture was taken: the sinking of the HMS Titanic.

Pendant l"éclipse© Eugène Atget / OneShot

French flâneur Eugene Atget (1857-1927) was a pioneering documentary photographer. His images of architecture, landscapes and fashion offer a unique glimpse of Paris and its culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In the 1920s, toward the end of his life, Atget's work attracted attention from avant-garde artists such as Man Ray, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso.

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Watch: OneShot — Back From The Gulag
Germany

Watch: OneShot — Back From The Gulag

He was born three years before Russia's October Revolution, and served in the Red Army during World War II. But in 1945, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn was arrested for criticizing Stalin, and spent eight years in a labor camp. The experience reshaped his political opinions and inspired his most famous works, including The Gulag Archipelago (1973). He won the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1970, but was hounded by the KGB, stripped of his citizenship, and expelled from the Soviet Union in 1974. He remained in exile for 20 years, before being allowed back in Russia in 1994 — after the fall of the USSR — where he died ten years ago on this day.

Alexandr Solzhenitsyn — © Bert Verhoeff / Anefo / OneShot

This photo was taken in 1974, during Solzhenitsyn's stay at his friend Heinrich Böll"s home, in Langenbroich, West Germany. He had been deported from the Soviet Union only two days earlier.

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Watch: OneShot — Addie Card, The Face Of Child Labor
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Watch: OneShot — Addie Card, The Face Of Child Labor

As a member of the National Child Labor Committee, starting in 1908, Lewis Hine photographed working children. His images helped expose their plight and end the practice. During World War I, he used his camera to document American Red Cross relief work in Europe. In the 1920s, Hine made a series of "work portraits' of children in dangerous factories. In 1938, the U.S. Congress passed the Fair Labor Standards Act, which prohibited anyone under the age of 16 from working during school hours. Hine's photographs were instrumental in bringing about that change.

Addie Card, 12 years — © Lewis Hine / OneShot

Addie Card was 11 when she became a spinner for a cotton mill in Vermont, where she and her older sister worked together. This photograph became a symbol of child labor reform, and was made into a 32-cent postage stamp in 1998.

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Watch: OneShot —  Vive Le Tour De France
Society

Watch: OneShot —  Vive Le Tour De France

Tour de France photographer Pauline Ballet has been capturing the cyclists around the country during the world's most iconic cycling race. This OneShot follows the athletes in the famously arduous Stage 10, in the French Alps.

Le Tour de France — © Pauline Ballet/ASO / OneShot

The Tour de France kicked off in Noirmoutier-En-L"Île on July 7, and after 3,351 kilometers of villages, mountain climbs and countryside, the peloton will reach the Paris finish line on July 29.

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Watch: OneShot — Subway Strangers
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Watch: OneShot — Subway Strangers

The legendary American photographer Walker Evans spent three years secretly capturing images of passengers in the New York Subway. He produced the Many Are Called series (1938-1941) by hiding his camera in his coat, and making the shutter release button accessible up his sleeve. Best known for his work through the Great Depression, Evans was interested throughout his career by documenting people in their everyday lives.

Many Are Called — © Walker Evans/Metropolitan Museum of Art / OneShot

Jeff Rosenheim, chief curator of photography at The Metropolitan Museum, has written 10 books on Evans. He describes Evans' process of taking his secret subway photos, where the subjects are unaware that they are being photographed, often seeming to be lost in their own thoughts. When multiple passengers are brought together in a single Evans frame, they are forever bound together in the urban portrait.

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Watch: OneShot — Mandela's Walk To Freedom
Geopolitics

Watch: OneShot — Mandela's Walk To Freedom

The world is marking the centennial of one of history's towering figures. Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela was born 100 years ago, on July 18, 1918, in a small village on the eastern cape of South Africa.

The man known as "Madiba" would go on to lead the struggle against Apartheid, before being sentenced to life in prison in 1964, on charges of treason and conspiracy. Mandela would wind up spending 27 years at Victor Verster Prison as his writings and the cause of black South Africans slowly began to spread around the world. Mandela's release on Feb. 11, 1990 was one of the great moments of the 20th century, paving the way for the end of Apartheid, national reconciliation and Mandela's election as South African president.

Mandela's Walk to Freedom — © Allan Tannenbaum / OneShot

The moment was captured most powerfully by New York-based photographer Allan Tannenbaum. A veteran war photographer who had covered earlier uprisings in South African townships, got the call from his Sygma agency to cover Mandela's release for TIME magazine.

Tannenbaum — who is otherwise best known for capturing the downtown New York City music scene in the late 1960s and 1970s — knew that following Mandela's release was a chance to witness history. Of course, he would hardly be the only photographer there; but with a quick eye, steady hand and a bit of luck, he walked away with the iconic shot.

See the OneShot video above for Tannenbaum's memory of that day.

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Watch: One Shot - World Cup Champion France, Frozen In Time
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Watch: One Shot - World Cup Champion France, Frozen In Time

France has brought home its second World Cup trophy, with a 4-2 victory over Croatia in the final in Moscow. For OneShot, we chose the image for the history books, accompanied by some locker-room singing ... that maybe we should have left in the locker room!?

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