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Dossier Perfumes: Luxury Fragrance Experience, At An Affordable Price

Dossier Perfumes: Luxury Fragrance Experience, At An Affordable Price

Fragrances have been an essential part of our daily routine since ancient times. From perfumes made with natural ingredients in ancient Egypt to modern day synthetic perfumes, the fragrance industry has come a long way. Dossier Perfumes, a luxury fragrance brand, is making a name for itself by offering a new kind of fragrance experience to its customers.

Dossier was founded out of a desire to make premium fragrances accessible to everyone. For the longest time perfumes have been sold for more than they cost to make. Dossier believes in changing the fragrance industry’s status quo.

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This Happened — February 3: Olympics Go Cold
This Happened

This Happened — February 3: Olympics Go Cold

On this day in 1924, during the first winter Olympics, Canada won the gold against the U.S. during an iconic hockey game.

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Image of a group of five people sitting on the grass inside of the Indian Institute of Technology campus.
Society

India Higher Education Inferior Complex: Where Are The Foreign University Campuses?

The proposed UGC guidelines are ill-conceived and populist, and hardly take note of the educational and financial interests of foreign universities.

NEW DELHI — Nearly 800,000 young people from India attend foreign universities every year in search of quality education and entrepreneurial training, resulting in a massive outflow of resources – $3 billion – to finance their education. These students look for greener pastures abroad because of the lack of quality teaching and research in most of India’s higher education institutions.

Over 40,000 colleges and 1,000 universities are producing unemployable graduates who cannot function in a knowledge- and technology-intensive economy.

The Indian government's solution is to open doors to foreign universities, with a proposed set of regulations aiming to provide higher education and research services to match global standards, and to control the outflow of resources. But this decision raises many questions.

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Photo of someone holding a phone
LGBTQ Plus

LGBTQ+ International: Lithuanian Fairy Tales, Egypt Dating App Gangs — And Other News

Welcome to Worldcrunch’s LGBTQ+ International. We bring you up-to-speed each week on a topic you may follow closely at home, but can now see from different places and perspectives around the world. Discover the latest news on everything LGBTQ+ — from all corners of the planet. All in one smooth scroll!

This week featuring:

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This Happened — February 2: Serum Run To Nome
This Happened

This Happened — February 2: Serum Run To Nome

On this day in 1925, amid an encroaching epidemic of diphtheria, a team of 20 mushers and about 150 sled dogs made the 674-mile trek across Alaska to deliver an antitoxin to the small town of Nome.
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This Happened — February 1: The Saigon Execution
This Happened

This Happened — February 1: The Saigon Execution

On this day in 1968, Nguyễn Văn Lém, a member of the Viet Cong, was summarily executed for alleged war crimes in Saigon during the Vietnam War. An Associated Press photographer captured the execution in one of the most iconic images in war reporting history.

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This Happened—January 31st:  McDonald's In The USSR
This Happened

This Happened—January 31st:  McDonald's In The USSR

Emerging from decades of communism and the Cold War with the United States, on this day in 1990, more than 5,000 people showed up at the opening of Moscow’s first McDonald's.

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Photo of five mothers holding their malnourished children
Society

In Northern Kenya, Where Climate Change Is Measured In Starving Children

The worst drought in 40 years, which has deepened from the effects of climate change, is hitting the young the hardest around the Horn of Africa. A close-up look at the victims, and attempts to save lives and limit lasting effects on an already fragile region in Kenya.

This article originally appeared on Inside Climate News, a nonprofit, independent news organization that covers climate, energy and the environment. It is republished with permission. Sign up for their newsletter here.

KAKUMA — The words "Stabilization Ward" are painted in uneven black letters above the entrance, but everyone in this massive refugee camp in Kakuma, Kenya, calls it ya maziwa: The place of milk.

Rescue workers and doctors, mothers and fathers, have carried hundreds of starving children through the doors of this one-room hospital wing, which is sometimes so crowded that babies and toddlers have to share beds. A pediatric unit is only a few steps away, but malnourished children don’t go there. They need special care, and even that doesn’t always save them.

In an office of the International Rescue Committee nearby, Vincent Opinya sits behind a desk with figures on dry-erase boards and a map of the camp on the walls around him. “We’ve lost 45 children this year due to malnutrition,” he says, juggling emergencies, phone calls, and texts. “We’re seeing a significant increase in malnutrition cases as a result of the drought — the worst we’ve faced in 40 years.”

From January to June, the ward experienced an 800 percent rise in admissions of children under 5 who needed treatment for malnourishment — a surge that aid groups blame mostly on a climate change-fueled drought that has turned the region into a parched barren.

Opinya, the nutrition manager for the IRC here, has had to rattle off these statistics many times, but the reality of the numbers is starting to crack his professional armor. “It’s a very sad situation,” he says, wearily. And he believes it will only get worse. A third year of drought is likely on the way.

More children may die. But millions will survive malnutrition and hunger only to live through a compromised future, researchers say. The longer-term health effects of this drought — weakened immune systems, developmental problems — will persist for a generation or more, with consequences that will cascade into communities and societies for decades.

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This Happened—January 30: Bloody Sunday
This Happened

This Happened—January 30: Bloody Sunday

On January 30, 1972, the worst mass shooting in Northern Irish history took place when British soldiers opened fire during a protest march.

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Photo of India's Prime Minister Narendra Modi and Russian President Vladimir Putin
Geopolitics

Modi Is Wrong: Russia's War Also Creates Real Risks For India

By shrugging aside Russia’s aggression, India has shown indifference to fears that China could follow Russia’s example.

-OpEd-

NEW DELHI — India is wrong to dismiss Russia’s war in Ukraine as Europe’s problem. The illegality and destructiveness of the invasion, and consequential food and energy crises, have global ramifications.

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This explains why 143 out of the 193 member-states of the UN General Assembly voted against recognizing Russia’s illegal annexation of four Ukrainian regions after holding sham referenda there. Ninety-three voted in favor of expelling Russia from the UN Human Rights Council.

India has abstained from every vote in the UN condemning Russia’s aggression in Ukraine. The reason? Moscow is India’s top arms supplier and some 70% of India’s military platforms are of Russian origin.

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Le Weekend: Endangered Odessa, Italy Gets Its Artifacts, Gravity-Defying Fashion
In The News

Le Weekend: Endangered Odessa, Italy Gets Its Artifacts, Gravity-Defying Fashion

January 28-29

  • Camel-inspired fabric
  • Leopard-print in Ukraine
  • Keep calm and parent on
  • … and much more.
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