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PARIS — Generational and gender debates rumbling inside the U.S. Democratic primary are setting off sparks as far away as Mexico and Australia. In an open letter to young women backing Democratic presidential candidate Bernie Sanders, the Sydney Morning Herald's Julie Szego scolds such millenials for suffering from wide-eyed naïveté. "From the ‘safe spaces' on campus, it can be hard to grasp the reality of structural discrimination," Szego writes for the Australian daily. "Once women enter the workforce, the shock tends to hit hard. The boys clubs. The society shaped around the assumption that men work full-time and wives stay home. The realization that having children fuels men's careers but stalls, or cripples, theirs. And suddenly everything from the gender pay gap to the gross under-representation of women in boardrooms, institutions and legislatures springs into focus."

More broadly, American millenials, the generation born between 1981 and 2000, have been increasingly maligned for their oversensitivity, a reliance on constant affirmation and the myriad ways in which their helicopter parents have failed to prepare them for life in the real world. Now, in the context of the 2016 presidential election, foreign media have joined in reproaching these fledgling citizens, who represent 30% of eligible voters in next year's election, a bloc that for the first time will rival the influence of the Baby Boomer generation.

Mexico City's El Universal, for example, characterizes them as unsophisticated indignants without the foggiest clue about the nature of political compromise. "Bernie Sanders' proposals — many of them sensible and even desirable — have no chance of becoming a reality, especially in Washington's current political climate," the newspaper's Leon Krauze writes. Cautioning these idealists who are in early political bloom, he urges young voters to accept that Sanders doesn't represent the political holy grail. "Sanders' ideas are far to the left of Hillary Clinton and even President Barack Obama, who himself has encountered major difficulties trying to operate in a context ruled by enormous legislative sectarianism. So, even if a Sanders presidency were to happen, this would lead to further, and in some ways more dangerous, polarization."

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Coronavirus

The Main COVID Risk Now: Long COVID

Death rates are down, masks are off, but many who have been infected by COVID have still not recovered. Long COVID continues to be hard to diagnose and treatments are still in the developmental stage.

Long COVID feels like a never-ending nightmare for those who suffer from it.

Jessica Berthereau

PARIS — The medical examination took longer than expected in the Parc de Castelnau-le-Lez clinic, near the southern French city of Montpellier. Jocelyne had come to see a specialist for long COVID-19, and exits the appointment slowly with help from her son. The meeting lasted more than an hour, twice as long as planned.

“I’m a fighter, you know, I’ve done a lot of things in my life, I’ve been around the world twice… I’m not saying this to brag, but to tell you my background," says the 40-year-old. "These days, I’m exhausted, I’m not hungry, I no longer drive, I can’t work anymore, I have restless legs syndrome.” She pauses before adding sadly: “I can’t read anymore either.”

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