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Trump supporter in Fayetteville, NC on March 9
Trump supporter in Fayetteville, NC on March 9
Worldrcrunch

From Latin America to Europe, the Middle East and beyond, newspapers around the world have expressed a growing mix of dismay and contempt as Donald Trump continues to rack up victories in the Republican party presidential primaries. But as the American billionaire moves closer to the nomination, international journalists are widening their analysis to note that this implausible political personage is not alone on the world stage. "Should we really laugh about the Republican debates when they build up their hate for Islam, without thinking about Le Pen, Orban and others?" Sophie Thresher writes for French daily Libération, referring to far-right French National Front Leader Marine Le Pen and Hungary's authoritarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban, both openly hostile to Muslims.

"Trump promised to erect a wall to stop migrants from entering the United States," Thresher continues. "But is there anything to laugh about and to lecture the Americans on when Europe is also letting insurmountable barriers be erected against migrants and refugees fleeing war, leaving them vulnerable to trafficking, the cold and death? Is British Prime Minister David Cameron any different from the Republican candidates when the former has washed his hands of the situation in Calais and the latter refuse to welcome refugees from Iraq and Syria?"

Danish daily Politiken asks rhetorically whether a Trump-like candidate could successfully emerge in Denmark, noting that one already did. Political scientist Martin Larsen writes that this Scandinavian Trump was named Mogens Glistrup, a controversial Danish politician, lawyer, tax protestor and parliament member (1973—1983 and 1987—1990) who founded the right-wing Progress Party. Glistrup too was outrageous, openly viewing tax cheats as "freedom fighters" and bragging on national television that he himself paid no income taxes.

"Perhaps most importantly, Glistrup, like Trump, was a political outsider," Larsen writes. "Secondly, Glistrup, like Trump, was saying things that were not only politically incorrect, but that seemed absolutely insane given the political culture that dominated in the '70s." Glistrup, for example, had suggested the abolition of the social security system to be replaced with oatmeal machines in the streets.

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Society

End Of Roe v. Wade, The World Is Watching

As the Supreme Court decides to overturn the 1973 decision that guaranteed abortion rights, many fear an imminent threat to abortion rights in the U.S. But in other countries, the global fight for sexual and reproductive rights is going in different directions.

"Don't abort my right" At 2019 pro-choice march In Toulouse, France.

Alain Pitton/NurPhoto via ZUMA
Hannah Steinkopf-Frank and Sophia Constantino

PARIS — Nearly 50 years after it ensured the right to abortion to Americans, the United States Supreme Court overturned the Roe v. Wade case, meaning that millions of women in the U.S. may lose their constitutional right to abortion.

The groundbreaking decision is likely to set off a range of restrictions on abortion access in multiple states in the U.S., half of which are expected to implement new bans on the procedure. Thirteen have already passed "trigger laws" that will automatically make abortion illegal.

U.S. President Joe Biden called the ruling "a tragic error" and urged individual states to enact laws to allow the procedure.

In a country divided on such a polarizing topic, the decision is likely to cause major shifts in American law and undoubtedly spark outrage among the country’s pro-choice groups. Yet the impact of such a momentous shift, like others in the United States, is also likely to reverberate around the world — and perhaps, eventually, back again in the 50 States.

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