When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Top Cities For Your Career Abroad

European cities dominate both the top and the bottom of the Urban Work Life Index, according to findings in the Expat Insider survey.

Photo of Munich, capital city of Germany's Free State of Bavaria

Munich, capital city of Germany's Free State of Bavaria.

iStock.com/ bkindler

Sponsored content

Global expat community InterNations conducts one of the biggest annual surveys of life abroad, Expat Insider. In 2021, over 12,000 expats representing 174 nationalities participated. Covering key areas such as job satisfaction, work-life balance, career prospects and more, the findings of the Urban Work Life Index offer unique insights into working life abroad.

The Winners

Munich is ranked the best city worldwide for the career-conscious expat. Expats in the Bavarian capital are particularly happy with the state of the local economy (94% positive ratings vs. 62% globally). Close to close to half (48%) even give it the best possible rating (vs.20% globally). Respondents are similarly happy with the local career opportunities (4th) and their job security (7th) in Munich.

However, life is not “all work and no play” for expats in Munich: close to four in five rate their working hours (79%) and work-life balance (78%) positively (vs. 66% globally for each factor). With more than twice the global average (27% vs. 11%), IT is the most common field of work by far, though an above-average share of expats in Munich also work in advertising, marketing & communication (13% vs. 5% globally) or manufacturing & engineering (9% vs. 7%globally).

With Aachen (2nd), a second German city joins Munich at the top of the Urban Work LifeIndex. Expats there give similarly good ratings in the Job Security (6th) and Work-Life Balance(8th) Subcategories. Over four in five expats in Aachen (85%) are also happy with their job in general (vs. 68% globally). And while the local career opportunities are not rated as favorably as in Munich, expats in Aachen are still much more likely to be satisfied with their prospects compared to the worldwide average (65% vs. 45% globally). Overall, education is the most commonly cited field of work in Aachen (26% vs. 12% globally), followed by the public sector(13% vs. 3% globally) and manufacturing & engineering (11% vs. 7% globally).

Dublin (3rd) also makes it onto the podium in the Urban Work Life Index. Expats in the Irish capital are particularly happy with their career prospects and job security, rating the city first worldwide for these two factors. About three-quarters of respondents are also satisfied with their work-life balance (75% vs. 66% globally) and working hours (74% vs. 66% globally) — only Copenhagen (1st) and Prague (2nd) do better in the corresponding subcategory.

This is good news for the above-average share of 42% of respondents who’ve moved to Dublin primarily for work-related reasons (vs. 36% globally). Dublin only gets comparably average results for respondents’ overall job satisfaction (30th) and the state of the local economy (33rd), though.

The Worst-Ranked Destinations

Rome not only places last overall in the Expat City Ranking 2021 but is also the worst destination in the Urban Work Life Index (57th out of 57 cities). In fact, it receives the worst results worldwide for job satisfaction, job security, and the local career opportunities, with nearly double the global average rating the career prospects in Rome negatively (60% vs. 33%globally).

Second-to-last placed Istanbul, on the other hand, is the worst place to be regarding work-life balance, at least according to expats. A third of respondents in Istanbul (33%) are dissatisfied with both their work-life balance (vs. 17% globally) and their working hours (vs. 16% globally). An even higher share also rates the state of the local economy negatively (52% vs. 19%globally) — 19% even give this factor the worst possible rating (vs. 4% globally).

Milan (55th) joins Rome in the bottom 3, with nearly half the expats in Milan (47%) viewing the local career opportunities negatively (vs. 33% globally). What’s more, twice the global average give the state of the local economy a negative rating (38% vs. 19% globally). And a quarter (25%) is dissatisfied with their working hours (vs. 16% globally).

Find out more in the complete Expat Insider 2021 report.

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

Capitol Riot, Brazil Style? The Specter Of Violence If Bolsonaro Loses The Presidency

Brazilian politics has a long history tainted with violence. As President Jair Bolsonaro threatens to not accept the results if he loses his reelection bid Sunday, the country could explode in ways similar to, or even worse, than the Jan. 6 assault on the U.S. Capitol after Donald Trump refused to accept his defeat.

Supporters of Brazil presidential candidates Bolsonaro and Lula cross the streets of Brasilia with banners ahead of the first round of the elections on Oct. 2.

Angela Alonso

-Analysis-

SÂO PAULO — Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro delivered a message to his nation this year on the anniversary of its independence day, September 7. He recalled what he saw as the nation’s good times, and bad, and declared: “Now, 2022, history may repeat itself. Good has always triumphed over evil. We are here because we believe in our people and our people believe in God.”

It was a moment that’s typical of how this president seeks to challenge the democratic rules. Bolsonaro has been seen as part of a new populist global wave. Ahead of Sunday's first round of voting, the sitting president is trailing in the polls, and former president Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva could even tally more than 50% to win the race outright and avoid an Oct. 30 runoff. Bolsonaro has said he might not accept the results of the race, which could spark violence from his supporters.

However, Brazil has a tradition of political violence. There is a national myth that the political elite prefer negotiation and avoid armed conflicts. Facts do not support the myth. If it did all major political change would have been peaceful: there would have been no independence war in 1822, no civil war in 1889 (when the republic replaced the monarchy) and, even the military coup, in 1964, would have been bloodless.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ