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This Happened

This Happened — July 29: Wedding Of Charles And Diana

Prince Charles and Lady Diana Spencer were married on this day in 1981 at St. Paul's Cathedral in London, England.

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How did Prince Charles and Princess Diana meet?

Prince Charles and Lady Diana met in 1977 when Charles was dating Diana's older sister, Sarah. Their paths crossed again in 1980 when Diana was invited to a polo match where Charles was playing. They developed a romantic relationship soon after.

How was Charles and Diana's wedding received by the public and the media?

The wedding was met with immense public and media interest. Millions of people across the globe tuned in to watch the ceremony on television. The event was seen as a fairytale wedding and captured the fascination and attention of people worldwide.

What happened to King Charles and Princess Diana's marriage?

King Charles and Lady Diana's marriage faced significant challenges leading to their divorce in 1996. Reports of extramarital relationships emerged, most notably Prince Charles’ affair with Camilla Parker Bowles, who is now his wife, the Duchess of Cornwall. Tragically, Diana passed away in a car accident in 1997, leaving a lasting impact on the British royal family and the public.

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food / travel

Legalizing Moonshine, A Winning Political Stand In Poland

Moonshine, typically known as “bimber” in Poland, may soon be legalized by the incoming government. There is a mix of tradition, politics and economics that makes homemade booze a popular issue to campaign on.

Photo of an empty vodka bottle on the ground in Poland

Bottle of vodka laying on the ground in Poland

Leszek Kostrzewski

WARSAWIt's a question of freedom — and quality. Poland's incoming coalition government is busy negotiating a platform for the coming years. Though there is much that still divides the Left, the liberal-centrist Civic Koalition, and the centrist Third Way partners, there is one area where Poland’s new ruling coalition is nearly unanimous: moonshine.

The slogan for the legalization of moonshine (known in Poland as "bimber") was initially presented by Michał Kołodziejczak, the leader of Agrounia, a left-wing socialist political movement in Poland that has qualified to be part of the incoming Parliament.

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”Formerly so-called moonshine was an important element of our cultural landscape, associated with mystery, breaking norms, and freedom from the state," Kołodziejczak said. "It was a reason to be proud, just like the liqueurs that Poles were famous for in the past.”

The president of Agrounia considered the right to make moonshine as a symbol of "subjectivity" that farmers could enjoy, and admitted with regret that in recent years it had been taken away from citizens. “It's also about a certain kind of freedom, to do whatever you want on your farm," Kołodziejczak adds. "This is subjectivity for the farmer. Therefore, I am in favor of providing farmers with the freedom to consume this alcohol for their own use.”

A similar viewpoint was aired by another Parliament member. “We will stop pretending that Polish farmers do not produce moonshine for their own use, such as for weddings,” the representative said, pointing out the benefits of controlling the quality. “Just like they produce slivovitz, which Poland is famous for. It's high time they did it legally.”

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