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This Happened

This Happened—January 2: The Trial Of The Century

Billed as “the trial of the century,” the case begins against Richard “Bruno” Hauptmann, accused of kidnapping and killing the 20-month-old son of renown aviator Charles Lindbergh.

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Who was Richard “Bruno” Hauptmann?

Bruno Hauptmann was a German immigrant who was accused of breaking into famous aviator Charles Lindbergh, house in March 1932 to kidnap his young child, Charles Jr.. The kidnapper left a ransom note.

What happened to Charles Lindbergh’s child?

Despite numerous back and forth attempts to exchange the child for ransom money, the corpse of Charles Lindbergh Jr. was discovered months later by the side of a road.

What was the Bruno Hauptmann trial’s verdict?

The trial created a furor because of Lindbergh’s celebrity and the grizzly nature of the crime. Legal scholars called it “the trial of the century”. Bruno Hauptmann never confessed, but was found guilty on Feb. 13, 1935. He was executed in the electric chair the following year. Some investigators have since questioned the independence of the trial.

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Economy

France, Portrait Of A Nation In Denial — In Our World In Denial

The continuous increase of public debt and a tone-deaf president in France, the rise of authoritarian regimes elsewhere in the world, the blindness to global warming: realities that we do not want to see and that will end up destroying us if we do not act.

Photo of ​police forces in riot gear clashing with demonstrators as piles of garbage burn in Paris on March 23

Police forces clashing with demonstrators as piles of garbage burn in Paris on March 23

Les Echos

-Analysis-

PARIS — In France, the denial of reality seems to be the only thing that all of our public figures have in common: The president (who is right to say that it is his role to propose unpopular measures) refuses to see that other solutions than his own were possible and that institutions will not be sufficient in the long term to legitimize his solitary decisions.

The parliamentary opposition groups refuse to see that they do not constitute a political majority, since they would be incapable of governing together and that they have in common, for too many of them, on both sides of the political spectrum, left and right, only the hatred of money, the mistrust of success, and the contempt for excellence.

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