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This Happened

This Happened — July 2: Thailand Cave Rescue

On this day in five years ago, rescue divers found 12 boys along with their soccer coach trapped in Tham Luang Nang Non cave complex in Thailand.

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How did the rescue divers locate the boys and their coach in the cave?

The rescue divers used a combination of methods to locate the boys and their coach. They employed divers, drones, and specialized equipment to search the flooded cave system. The boys were eventually discovered about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) from the cave entrance on a dry ledge.

How long were the boys and their coach trapped in the cave?

The boys and their coach were trapped in the cave for a total of 18 days. They went missing on June 23, 2018, and were found alive on July 2, 2018.

How were the boys and their coach rescued from the cave?

The rescue operation involved a large international team of divers, including Thai Navy SEALs and divers from various countries. They used a combination of strategies, including guiding the boys through flooded sections with the help of divers, setting up rope systems, and utilizing pumps to reduce water levels. Ultimately, the boys were brought out of the cave in groups using stretchers and a system of pulleys.

Were there any casualties during the rescue operation?

While the rescue operation was successful in bringing all 12 boys and their coach out of the cave, there was one casualty during the process. Saman Kunan, a former Thai Navy SEAL, died while delivering oxygen tanks to the trapped group.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

War, Corruption And The Overdue Demise Of Ukrainian Oligarchs

The invasion of Russia has forced Ukraine to confront a domestic enemy: corruption and economic control by an insular and unethical elite.

Photograph of three masked demonstrators holding black smoke lights.

May 21, 2021, Ukraine: Demonstrators hold smoke bombs outside the Appeal Court of Kyiv.

Olena Khudiakova/ZUMA
Guillaume Ptak

-Analysis-

KYIV — Since Russia’s invasion, Ukraine's all-powerful oligarchs have lost a significant chunk of their wealth and political influence. However, the fight against the corruption that plagues the country is only just beginning.

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On the morning of September 2, several men wearing balaclavas and bullet-proof waistcoats bearing the initials "SBU" arrived at the door of an opulent mansion in Dnipro, Ukraine's fourth largest city. Facing them, his countenance frowning behind thin-rimmed glasses, was the owner of the house, the oligarch Ihor Kolomoisky.

Officers from the Ukrainian security services had come to hand him a "suspicion notice" as part of an investigation into "fraud" and "money laundering". His home was searched, and shortly afterwards he was remanded in custody, with bail set at 509 million hryvnias, or more than €1.3 million. A photo of the operation published that very morning by the security services was widely shared on social networks and then picked up by various media outlets.

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