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This Happened

This Happened—December 13: End Of The Road For The Butcher Of Baghdad

What happened today in history — in one iconic photograph: December 13 from Worldcrunch on Vimeo.

On this day, 19 years ago, Saddam Hussein was captured by the United States military in the town of Ad-Dawr, Iraq.

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Why was the U.S. at war with Iraq?

In 2003, a coalition between the United States and British forces initiated war on Iraq to depose Saddam Hussein. U.S. President George W. Bush and British Prime Minister Tony Blair accused Iraq of possessing weapons of mass destruction and Hussein having ties to al-Qaeda.

After having conquered Baghdad, the codenamed Operation Red Dawn continued to track down the Iraqi leader. The mission was executed by an elite and covert joint special operations team, and U.S. soldiers found Saddam Hussein hiding in a six-to-eight-foot deep “spider hole” after he'd spent nine months on the run.

What happened to Saddam Hussein after he was captured?

After his capture, Saddam's trial took place under the Iraqi Interim Government. On November 5, 2006, he was convicted of crimes against humanity related to the 1982 killing of 148 Iraqi Shi'a and sentenced to death by hanging. He was executed on December 30 of the same year.

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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