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This Happened

This Happened — December 19: Assassination In An Art Gallery

The Russian diplomat Andrei Karlov served as an ambassador to North Korea, and then Turkey. On this day in 2016, he was assassinated while giving a speech in Turkey. The moment was captured by an Associated Press photographer who had been assigned to cover the speech.

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How was Andrei Karlov assassinated?

He was assassinated by Mevlüt Mert Altıntaş, an off-duty Turkish police officer, while at an art exhibition in Ankara, Turkey. Altıntaş, who was dressed in a suit and tie, shot him at point-blank range fatally wounding Karlov and injuring others.

Why was Andrei Karlov assassinated?

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan declared at the time that the murder was designed to disrupt the warming Russia–Turkey relations. It has also been suggested that a possible motive was revenge for the Russian Air Force's targeting of rebel-held areas in Aleppo, Syria.

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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