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This Happened

This Happened—December 5: Bottoms Up, Prohibition No More!

Prohibition in the United States was implemented as a constitutional law prohibiting the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 until this day in 1933.

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Why was Prohibition first put into place?

Prohibitionists first attempted to end the trade in alcoholic drinks during the 19th century, led mostly by pious Protestants. To them, it was an opportunity to fix alcohol-related problems like addiction, family violence, and political corruption happening in secret at saloons.

Why was Prohibition ended?

Although, Some research indicates that alcohol consumption declined substantially due to Prohibition and rates of liver cirrhosis, alcoholic psychosis, and infant mortality declined, when the Great Depression hit, potential tax revenue from alcohol sales became appealing to the government. When Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for President in 1932, he made a promise to re-legalize drinking and on December 5, 1933 he fulfilled that promise.

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Society

War In The Age Of Tik Tok, A Parental Guide To Your Child's Mental Health

Many children are struggling with what feels like a constant state of crisis. Parents are right to be concerned, but they should not try to shield kids. Instead, it's all about communication.

War In The Age Of Tik Tok, A Parental Guide To Your Child's Mental Health

A boy plays on a mobile phone in an apartment that was damaged by Russian shelling in Kharkiv, Ukraine

Elke Hartmann-Wolff

One afternoon in the Swabian Alps in Germany, Anna Jüttler is driving along with her sons Maris, 10, and Silvan, 8, in the back. They are chatting about school and what they’d like to eat tonight when the news comes on the car radio: Russian attacks continue on Ukraine. The German army is ill-equipped for battle.

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One week later, Jüttler thinks back to that car journey. She looked in the rear-view mirror and saw in her sons’ eyes that “nothing is the same”. Her younger son bombarded her with questions about why the German army didn’t have any “good rockets and planes”. His older brother joined in.

His friend had said there was going to be a Third World War. Was that true? Would there be a nuclear attack?

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