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This Happened

This Happened—December 5: Bottoms Up, Prohibition No More!

Prohibition in the United States was implemented as a constitutional law prohibiting the production, importation, transportation, and sale of alcoholic beverages from 1920 until this day in 1933.

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Why was Prohibition first put into place?

Prohibitionists first attempted to end the trade in alcoholic drinks during the 19th century, led mostly by pious Protestants. To them, it was an opportunity to fix alcohol-related problems like addiction, family violence, and political corruption happening in secret at saloons.

Why was Prohibition ended?

Although, Some research indicates that alcohol consumption declined substantially due to Prohibition and rates of liver cirrhosis, alcoholic psychosis, and infant mortality declined, when the Great Depression hit, potential tax revenue from alcohol sales became appealing to the government. When Franklin D. Roosevelt ran for President in 1932, he made a promise to re-legalize drinking and on December 5, 1933 he fulfilled that promise.

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