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This Happened

This Happened - February 14: Parkland Shooting

On this day five years ago, a mass shooting occurred at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, in which 17 people were killed and 17 others were injured.


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Who was the shooter in the Parkland shooting?

The shooter was identified as Nikolas Cruz, a 19-year-old former student of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. He was arrested and charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder. Cruz was convicted and sentenced to life in prison with no possibility of parole.

What was the response to the Parkland shooting? 

The Parkland shooting prompted a renewed national debate about gun control, with many students from the school becoming vocal advocates for stricter gun laws. The shooting also led to increased security measures at schools across the United States.

What has been done to prevent future school shootings?

In the wake of the Parkland shooting, some states and the federal government implemented new laws and regulations to prevent future school shootings, including measures to improve school security, increase background checks for gun buyers, and raise the minimum age for purchasing certain types of firearms. However, the effectiveness of these measures is still debated.

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Ukraine

Pilots First, Then The Planes? The West Looks Ready To Break Major "Taboo" On Ukraine Arms

French President Emmanuel Macron's announcement that France will train Ukrainian pilots appears to pave the way for the delivery of fighter jets to Kyiv. Similar moves are coming from the UK. It's a delicate process to never declare war on Russia, while maximizing Ukraine's ability to repulse the invaders.

Image of a State of Emergency Service aviator in Ukraine.

A SES aviator in Ukraine.

State Emergency Service of Ukraine
Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Another taboo has been broken. France will train Ukrainian fighter pilots, as announced by French President Emmanuel Macron Monday night in his interview on the TF1 television channel. The logical next step is to provide Mirage 2000 aircraft to the Ukrainian air force, but we haven't reached that point yet.

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It is however an important step forward in the commitment to Ukraine, and is in line with the logic of the last few months. It comes in addition to the Caesar guns, light armor, and air defense missile systems that France has already delivered and continues to supply to Ukraine.

Macron denied last night that there was any taboo on supplying aircraft. In fact, at each stage, since the beginning of the Russian invasion, Ukraine's allies have weighed both the needs and capabilities of the Ukrainians, and the possible reaction of the Russians, before taking each new step.

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