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This Happened

This Happened—November 12: Nadia Comăneci, Perfection From Romania

Romania's Nadia Comăneci is credited with popularizing the sport of gymnastics worldwide, getting her successful start at a very young age.

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Who is Nadia Comăneci?

Born November 12, 1961, the Romanian gymnast became a household name after a successful career, winning five Olympic gold medals all in individual events.

How old was Nadia Comăneci when she hit her peak?

In 1976, at the age of 14, Comăneci was the first gymnast to be awarded a perfect score of 10.0 at the Olympic Games, held in Montreal, Canada.

Where is Nadia Comăneci now?

In 2000 Comăneci was named one of the Athletes of the 20th Century by the Laureus World Sports Academy. She has lived in the United States since 1989, working with and marrying American Olympic gold-medal gymnast Bart Conner, who set up his own gymnastics school.

In October 2017, an area in the Olympic Park in Montreal was renamed "Place Nadia Comaneci" in her honor.

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Economy

Why More Countries Are Banning Foreigners From Buying Real Estate

Canada has become the most recent country to impose restrictions on non-residents buying real estate, arguing that wealthy investors from other countries are pricing out would-be local homeowners. But is singling out foreigners the best way to face a troubled housing market?

Photo of someone walking by houses in Toronto

A person walks by a row of houses in Toronto

Shaun Lavelle, Riley Sparks, Ginevra Falciani

PARIS — It’s easy to forget that soon after the outbreak of COVID-19, many real estate experts were forecasting that housing prices could face a once-in-generation drop. The logic was that a shrinking pandemic economy would combine with people moving out of cities to push costs down in a lasting way.

Ultimately, in most places, the opposite has happened. Home prices in the U.S., Canada, Britain, Germany, Australia and New Zealand rose between 25% and 50% since the outbreak of COVID-19.

This explosion was driven by a number of factors, including low interest rates, supply chain issues in construction and shortages in available properties caused in part by investors buying up large swathes of housing stock.

Yet some see another culprit deserving of particular attention: foreign buyers.

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