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This Happened

This Happened—December 8: The Day The Music Died

A deranged fan shot and killed former Beatles member John Lennon outside of his apartment on the upper West Side of New York City. Lennon's death shocked the world, and seemed to put a definitive end to the 1960s and 1970s idealist dreams of peace and love.

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How was John Lennon murdered?

While returning home with his wife Yoko Ono, Lennon was shot four times in the back by Mark David Chapman outside the Dakota apartment building in New York City. For months prior to the murder, Chapman had been stalking Lennon and had even tried to get an autograph from him earlier on the day of the murder. The singer was pronounced dead on arrival at the nearby Roosevelt Hospital. He was 40 years old.

What is John Lennon’s legacy?

It is said that the influence of John Lennon and the Beatles on the sound, style, and attitude of popular music was a veritable "revolution," more than just the lead wave of the so-called British invasion. But Lennon's legacy goes beyond just the music: he was a passionate activist, advocating for world peace, in particular in his speaking out against the Vietnam War. He used his fame and platform to bring attention to important causes, inspiring people to stand up against injustice. He was also an outspoken advocate for the rights of women and people of color.

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Ideas

The Colonial Spirit And "Soft Racism" Of White Savior Syndrome

Tracing back to Christian colonialism, which was supposed to somehow "civilize" and save the souls of native people, White Savior Syndrome lives on in modern times: from Mother Teresa to Princess Diana and the current First Lady of Colombia, Verónica Alcocer.

photo of a child patient holding hand of an adult

Good intentions are part of the formula

Ton Koene / Vwpics/ZUMA
Sher Herrera

-Analysis-

CARTAGENA — The White Savior Syndrome is a social practice that exploits or economically, politically, symbolically takes advantage of individuals or communities they've racialized, perceiving them as in need of being saved and thus forever indebted and grateful to the white savior.

Although this racist phenomenon has gained more visibility and sparked public debate with the rise of social media, it is actually as old as European colonization itself. It's important to remember that one of Europe's main justifications for subjugating, pillaging and enslaving African and American territories was to bring "civilization and save their souls" through "missions."

Even today, many white supremacists hold onto these ideas. In other words, they believe that we still owe them something.

This white savior phenomenon is a legacy of Christian colonialism, and among its notable figures, we can highlight Saint Peter Claver, known as "the slave of the slaves," Bartolomé de Las Casas, Mother Teresa of Calcutta, Princess Diana herself, and even the First Lady of Colombia, Verónica Alcocer.

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