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This Happened

This Happened—December 6: A Venezuela Military Man Is The New Face Of Latin America's Left

Founder of the Revolutionary Bolivarian Movement-200 (MBR-200) in the early 1980s, Hugo Chavez went on to be elected president of Venezuela in late 1998, serving until his death in 2013.

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How did Hugo Chavez rise to power?

Chávez led the MBR-200 in an unsuccessful coup against the Democratic Action Government of then President Carlos Andrés Pérez in 1992, for which he was imprisoned. After serving two years, he founded the Fifth Republic Movement political party and was eventually elected president of Venezuela on Dec. 6 1998, receiving 56.2% of the vote.

What is Chavismo?

Hugo Chávez considered himself the leader of the so-called “Bolivarian Revolution,” with a socialist economic program for much of Latin America, named after Simón Bolívar, the South American independence hero. Beyond the programs of helping the country's poor, Chávez's leadership was based on nationalism and a strong military. His ideology became widely known as simply Chavismo.

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Future

Listening For Illness: Your Voice May Soon Help Detect Health Problems

Applying Artificial intelligence to vocal cues is increasingly being used to detect a range of illnesses from COVID-19 to asthma and even depression. But such technology also comes with serious ethical concerns.

photo of a man yelling with white paint in background

What's that you say?

Guillaume de Germain Unsplash
Benoît Georges

PARIS — Thanks to artificial intelligence (AI), your voice can already be used to dictate messages to your smartphone, give commands to your Bluetooth speakers, or chat with your car's dashboard. But soon, it may be able to evaluate the state of your health by detecting respiratory (asthma, COVID-19) or neurodegenerative illnesses. It could even pick up mental health struggles, such as depression or anxiety.

The concept is simple: every pathology that affects the lungs, the heart, the brain, the muscles, or the vocal cords can lead to voice modifications. By using digital tools to analyze a recording, it must be possible to detect vocal biomarkers, the same way vocal recognition algorithms learned to understand a spoken language based on millions of sound samples.

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