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This Happened

This Happened—December 9: The First Intifada Ignites

A series of Palestinian protests and violent uprisings in the West Bank, Gaza and Israel began in defiance of Israeli occupation.

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How Did The Intifada Begin? 

An Israeli Defense Forces' (IDF) truck collided with a civilian car, killing four Palestinian workers, three of whom were from the Jabalia refugee camp. Palestinians thought that the collision was a deliberate response for the killing of a Jewish person in Gaza several days earlier.

Though Israel denied that the crash was intentional, the tragedy came at a time of heightened tensions in the region. Palestinians retaliated by throwing rocks, road-blocking and tire burning throughout the territories.

How did the world react to the Intifada?

On 17 February 1989, the UN Security Council drafted a resolution condemning Israel for disregarding Security Council resolutions, and for not complying with Geneva Convention law. The United States put a veto on a draft resolution condemning alleged Israeli violations of human rights

The Intifada was recognized as an occasion where the Palestinians acted cohesively and independently of their leadership or assistance of neighboring Arab states, and broke the image of Jerusalem as a Israeli city. There was international coverage, and the Israeli response was criticized by media outlets internationally.

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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