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This Happened

This Happened - January 25: The Egyptian Revolution Begins

After the revolution in Tunisia, anti-regime protests spread to Egypt, sparking two weeks of deadly clashes.

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How did the Jan. 25 Revolution begin?

As a statement against increasing police brutality during the last few years of Hosni Mubarak's presidency, young people in Egypt ran demonstrations, marches, occupations of plazas, non-violent civil resistance, acts of civil disobedience and strikes. Following the initial movement, millions of protesters from a range of socio-economic and religious backgrounds demanded the overthrow of then President Hosni Mubarak.

What was the outcome of the Egyptian Revolution?

Clashes between security forces and protesters resulted in at least 846 deaths and over 6,000 injuries. Protesters also burned over 90 police stations across Egypt. On 11 February 2011, Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that Mubarak resigned as president, turning power over to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). the Muslim Brotherhood then took power in Egypt after a series of popular elections, with Islamist Mohamed Morsi ascending to the presidency in June 2012.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Report: Ukrainian Children Sent To Indoctrination Camps In Crimea And Russia's Far East

A new report documents how Russia has been sending thousands of Ukrainian children to different Russian run re-education camps, where they are being indoctrinated with pro-Kremlin views.

Photo of the airport in Magadan, Russia

At the airport in the far eastern Russian region of Magadan

Cameron Manley

Since Vladimir Putin's invasion of Ukraine began, Russian authorities have deported at least 6,000 Ukrainian children to a network of re-education and adoption centers in occupied Crimea and in rural locations in Russia, according to a new report by Conflict Observatory, in conjunction with the Humanities Research Laboratory at the Yale School of Public Health.

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The investigators have identified 43 institutions that have held children from Ukraine since the start of the invasion on Feb. 24.

The main purpose of the camps is political and ideological inculcation — at least 32 of them are engaged in systematic re-education, focused on Russian academic, cultural, patriotic, and/or military education.

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