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This Happened

This Happened - January 25: The Egyptian Revolution Begins

After the revolution in Tunisia, anti-regime protests spread to Egypt, sparking two weeks of deadly clashes.

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How did the Jan. 25 Revolution begin?

As a statement against increasing police brutality during the last few years of Hosni Mubarak's presidency, young people in Egypt ran demonstrations, marches, occupations of plazas, non-violent civil resistance, acts of civil disobedience and strikes. Following the initial movement, millions of protesters from a range of socio-economic and religious backgrounds demanded the overthrow of then President Hosni Mubarak.

What was the outcome of the Egyptian Revolution?

Clashes between security forces and protesters resulted in at least 846 deaths and over 6,000 injuries. Protesters also burned over 90 police stations across Egypt. On 11 February 2011, Vice President Omar Suleiman announced that Mubarak resigned as president, turning power over to the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces (SCAF). the Muslim Brotherhood then took power in Egypt after a series of popular elections, with Islamist Mohamed Morsi ascending to the presidency in June 2012.

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LGBTQ Plus

Mayan And Out! Living Proudly As An Indigenous Gay Man

Being gay and indigenous can mean facing double discrimination, including from within the communities they belong to. But LGBTQ+ indigenous people in Guatemala are liberating their sexuality and reclaiming their cultural heritage.

Photo of the March of Dignity in Guatemala

The March of Dignity in Guatemala

Teresa Son and Emma Gómez

CANTEL — Enrique Salanic and Arcadio Salanic are two K'iché Mayan gay men from this western Guatemalan city

Fire is a powerful symbol for them. Associated with the sons and daughters of Tohil, the god who bestows fire in Mayan culture, it becomes the mirror and the passage that allows them to see and express their sexuality. It is a portal that connects people with their grandmothers and grandfathers, the cosmos and the energies that the earth transmits.

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