When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Pope Francis: Argentina's Bergoglio New Leader Of Catholic Church

VATICAN CITY- After the surprise resignation of Benedict XVI, the calls to find a strong administrator to reform the governance of the Church, days of speculation and two rounds of black smoke...the white smoke came after the cardinals chose a new leader for the Catholic Church known for his humility, and notably the first pontiff from the "New World," the Argentine-born Jorge Mario Bergoglio, now seared into history as Pope Francis.

The Archbishop of Buenos Aires was elected Wednesday evening with the white smoke appearing from the papal chimney just after 7pm local time. An hour later, French Cardinal Jean-Louis Tauran announced “Habemus Papam”, introducing the first ever Latin-American pope (Video below).

Bergoglio brings many firsts to this papacy: the first Jesuit priest elected pope, the first in a millenium from outside of Europe, and the first to take the name Francis. The Pope, 76, is the 266th to take the throne of St. Peter. Observers say even just the choice of his name signals the beginning of a new era within the Church. The name Francis is most certainly for St. Francis of Assisi, the 12th-13th-century founder of the Franciscan order, whose plan to rebuild the Church consisted of giving away all worldly possessions.

Addressing the crowd for the first time, Pope Francis seemed to speak from the heart with a hint of a smile when he said “buona sera” (Video at bottom). Before he blessed the crowd, he asked the faithful to pray for him -- a never-before-seen sign of humility. He called himself the Bishop of Rome, not just the Pope, saying that his brother cardinals went to fetch him “at the edge of the world.”

This momentous day has drawn reactions from all over the world, especially from Argentina and the rest of Latin America.

HABEMUS PAPAM FRANCISCUM

— Pontifex (@Pontifex) March 13, 2013

A diferencia de muuuuuuuchos y reconocidos prepotentes Argentinos el #Papa#FranciscoI parece amigable, amable y buena papa!! @susoelpaspi

— Angélica (@Maryhangelik) March 13, 2013

#Bergoglio#FranciscoI La gente se empieza a reunir en el Obelisco de Buenos Aires, Argentina. twitter.com/Bracesco/statu…

— Bracesco (@Bracesco) March 13, 2013

A new pope,a new hope...un nuevo papa, una nueva esperanza... #FranciscoI#FE

— María José Barraza (@MJoseBarraza) March 13, 2013

Following the #habemuspapam announcement of the new Pope, Twitter saw 130 million tweets per minute about @pontifex!

— Twitter Religion (@twitterreligion) March 13, 2013

Praying for the new Pope Francis. May he be a grace-filled shepherd, a wise leader, & a tangible expression of Christ's love. #HabemusPapam

— Kyle Horner (@KyleJHorner) March 13, 2013

Francis I was the only one in the balcony not wearing a GOLDEN crucifix.A good sign. I never understood ostentation in a Pope. #HabemusPapam

— Bricio Segovia (@briciosegovia) March 13, 2013

You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
Geopolitics

One By One, The Former Soviet Republics Are Abandoning Putin

From Kazakhstan to Kyrgyzstan, Armenia and Tajikistan, countries in Russia's orbit have refused to help him turn the tide in the Ukraine war. All (maybe even Belarus?) is coming to understand that his next step would be a complete restoration of the Soviet empire.

Leaders of Armenia, Russia, Tajikistan, Belarus, Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan attend a summit marking the 30th anniversary of signing the Collective Security Treaty in Moscow on May 16.

Oleksandr Demchenko

-Analysis-

KYIV — Virtually all of Vladimir Putin's last remaining partner countries in the region are gone from his grip. Kazakhstan, Armenia, Tajikistan, and Kyrgyzstan have refused to help him turn the tide in the Ukraine war, because they've all come to understand that his next step would be a complete restoration of the empire, where their own sovereignty is lost.

Stay up-to-date with the latest on the Russia-Ukraine war, with our exclusive international coverage.

Sign up to our free daily newsletter.

Before zooming in on the current state of relations in the region, and what it means for Ukraine's destiny, it's worth briefly reviewing the last 30 years of post-Soviet history.

The Collective Security Treaty Organization (CSTO) was first created in 1992 by the Kremlin to keep former republics from fully seceding from the former Soviet sphere of influence. The plan was simple: to destroy the local Communist elite, to replace them with "their" people in the former colonies, and then return these territories — never truly considered as independent states by any Russian leadership — into its orbit.

In a word - to restore the USSR.

Keep reading...Show less

When the world gets closer, we help you see farther

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter!
You've reached your monthly limit of free articles.
To read the full article, please subscribe.
Get unlimited access. Support Worldcrunch's unique mission:
  • Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.
  • Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries
  • $2.90/month or $19.90/year. No hidden charges. Cancel anytime.
Already a subscriber? Log in
Writing contest - My pandemic story
THE LATEST
FOCUS
TRENDING TOPICS

Central to the tragic absurdity of this war is the question of language. Vladimir Putin has repeated that protecting ethnic Russians and the Russian-speaking populations of Ukraine was a driving motivation for his invasion.

Yet one month on, a quick look at the map shows that many of the worst-hit cities are those where Russian is the predominant language: Kharkiv, Odesa, Kherson.

Watch VideoShow less
MOST READ