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Brazilian Cardinals Want To See 'Vatileaks' Findings Before Conclave

The Holy See has said that the final report on the scandal plaguing the Vatican would only be delivered to the new pope. But some of those voting for the pontiff want to know the truth.

St. Peters, Rome
St. Peters, Rome
Bernardo Mello Franco and Fabiano Maisonnave

ROME - Cardinal Geraldo Majella Agnelo, one of the five Brazilians set to participate in the conclave to pick the next pope, said that he will request access to the secret report delivered to Benedict XVI with information on scandals within the Church.

Last week, the Holy See said that the findings of so-called "Vatileaks" case, in a report delivered to then Pope Benedict XVI by a trio of over-80 Cardinals, will only be delivered to the new pontiff. The scandal, which was first exposed in early 2012, involved leaked papal documents and an alleged ring of corruption inside the Vatican -- and eventually led to the arrest of the Pope's butler Paolo Gabriele.

Cardinal Agnelo, 79, emeritus archbishop of Sao Salvador da Bahia and primate emeritus of Brazil, wants the report given to the 115 cardinals who are going to vote in the conclave.

“If there was a comission and they reached any conclusion, we will want to know it,” he told Folha.

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A file photo of Agnelo (credit: Marcello Casal)

Citing unnamed sources, the Italian magazine "Panorama" and the Rome daily "La Repubblica" claim the report describes a network of corruption and homosexual prostitution within the Holy See. Some sources say it was part of the reason Benedict decided to resign.

The Vatican has denounced the Italian press' versions of events.

Cardinal Raymundo Damasceno Assis, president of Brazilian Conference of Bishops, said he expects to see at least a summary of the findings before voting. “It is important to know what is said in these papers. Up to now, all I know is from what the news is saying.”

Brazilian pope

Frequently mentioned as one of the possible candidates to succeed Benedict XVI, the archbishop of São Paulo, Cardinal Odilo Scherer, says it is just “fantasy” that he or anyone else arrives in Rome as a favorites to become pope. Such definitions should come only when meetings among cardinals start, he added.

"Saying that, before the conclave, all the candidates are ready is part of the fantasy – which we comprehend very well, but it is not the real job that will start from now on”, he told the Vatican Radio.

Cardinal Geraldo Agnelo said he has five possible candidates in mind and that the conclave, expected to begin in the coming days, will start with no favorites. “We hold no one above others. Everybody is more os less at the same level.”

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Searching For Marianna, A Pregnant Doctor From Mariupol Held Captive By The Russians

We’ve heard about the plight of the soldiers-turned-prisoners from Mariupol. Here are some traces of the disturbing fate of a young female doctor who’s been taken away.

A paper dove reads "Mariupol" at a shelter for displaced children in Uzhhorod, western Ukraine.

Paweł Smoleński

"Wait for me, because I will return…"

Marianna Mamonova wrote these words to her family, among the text messages and short phone calls that are the only remaining fragments used to piece together her recent past. We also have a photo of her, posted on Russian websites, where she looks into the lens, gaunt and exhausted, signed with a number like a concentration camp prisoner.

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Until the Russian-Ukrainian war, Mamonova’s biography was available to anyone who wanted to know. She was born in 1991, studied at the Ternopil Medical University, and later at the Kyiv Military Academy. After completing her studies, she was sent to work in the coastal city of Berdiansk. Her mother says that this is where her daughter's dream came true: She’d always wanted to be a military doctor, and worked in Berdiansk for three years, receiving the rank of officer in the Ukrainian army.

Beginning in 2014, she’d worked stints as a front-line doctor in the Donbas region, and when Russia invaded Ukraine in February she went to war again. This time in Mariupol.

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