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Wanted: Adventurous Female To Give Birth To Neanderthal

DER SPIEGEL (Germany), NEWS.COM.AU (Australia)

Worldcrunch

BOSTON - George Church, a Harvard School of Medicine genetics professor, believes that he can create a Neanderthal baby. All he needs is an “adventurous female.”

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George Church at TED 2010. Photo: Life, Synthetic Life!

He told German magazineDer Spiegel: “I have already managed to attract enough DNA from fossil bones to reconstruct the DNA of the largely extinct species. Now, I just need an adventurous female human.”

In the interview, the geneticist stated “Neanderthals might think differently than we do. We know that they had a larger cranial size. They could even be more intelligent than us. When the time comes to deal with an epidemic or getting off the planet or whatever, it's conceivable that their way of thinking could be beneficial.”

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Forensic reconstruction of Neanderthals. Photo: Cicero Moraes

The technique of creating viable cells to reproduce involves artificially creating DNA from fossilized material and introducing this into human stem cell lines. Church discusses the idea in his latest book, Regenesis: How Synthetic Biology Will Reinvent Nature and Ourselves.

If the process is successful, says news.com.au, these Neanderthal humans could live to the old age of 120 (or even 150) and be immune to viruses as well as resistant to cancer. Commonly thought of as primitive cave dwellers, new research has found that Neanderthals were more like us than we had previously thought and may even have interbred with Homo sapiens.

A topic that often causes much discussion, the ethics of genetic engineering is something Church believes should be openly discussed by everyone: “I think we should be quite cautious, but that doesn't mean that we should put moratoriums on new technologies. It means licensing, surveillance, doing tests. And we actually must make sure the public is educated about them. It would be great if all the politicians in the world were as technologically savvy as the average citizen is politically savvy.”

Neanderthal man & woman in Neanderthal museum, Germany. Photo: UNiesert

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Saturate The East! Poland Revamps Its Military Strategy In Response To Russian Threat

Poland has a border with Russia and Belarus, so it is not just watching how the Ukraine war develops. Warsaw is rethinking its entire defense strategy.

Photo of a Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Wisztyniec, Poland. A Polish soldier seen working at the construction of the fence along the border with the Russian exclave of Kaliningrad.

Attila Husejnow / SOPA Images via ZUMA Press Wire
Stanislav Zhelikhovsky

KYIV — It will soon be exactly one year since the Russian Federation launched its large-scale invasion of Ukraine. During that time, neighboring Poland has been playing the role of a front-line country — NATO's eastern outpost.

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Polish government agencies have been hard at work on what to do if the country is attacked. In particular, a new defense directive. After all, Poland’s Political and Strategic Defense Directive, which has been in effect since 2018, must be updated because it simply doesn't match today's reality.

Poland's Deputy Minister of National Defense, Wojciech Skurkiewicz, announced a change in defense doctrine with the defense forces set up on the Vistula River, located in northeastern Poland. Ukraine's experience shows the need to protect the country's entire territory as quickly as possible.

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