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LE MONDE (France), E-DIASPORA.FR

PARIS - A group of researchers has created the first comprehensive world map of immigrant diasporas, Le Monde reports. Called the "e-Diaspora Atlas' and published by the Maison des Sciences de l'Homme in Paris, the website classifies and analyzes the online presence of 28 diasporas:

"A migrant site is a website created or managed by migrants and/or that deals with them (at any rate, a site for which migration or diasporas is a defining theme). This can be a personal site or blog, the site of an association, a portal/forum, an institutional site, or anything similar," explains e-diaspora.fr.

The project, initiated in 2003, brought together 80 researchers from around the world who studied over 8,000 websites linked to diasporas. They found that the online geography of these communities did not always correspond to their actual physical location. One of the most popular websites for the Palestinian diaspora, for instance, is a website called The Electronic Intifada that was created by American citizens of Palestinian origin and hosted in the United States.

Results also indicate that each diaspora maintains different relations with its home country. The French e-diaspora is heavily structured around institutional websites, a reflection of France's strong and protective state; whereas the Moroccan and Mexican e-diasporas have almost no links to their home institutions.

The atlas is still a work in progress, with new e-diasporas emerging as immigrant communities find a voice online, as is the case for the Chinese Uyghur community, and with other online diasporas still unexplored - in sub-Saharan Africa for instance. A free iPhone app is available for the public to discover the researchers' work.

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Society

Mahsa Amini, Martyr Of An Iranian Regime Designed To Abuse Women

The 22-year-old is believed to have been beaten to death at a Tehran police station last week after "morality police" had reprimanded her clothing. The case has sparked the nation's outrage. But as ordinary Iranians testify, such beatings, torture and a home brand of misogyny are hallmarks of the 40-year Islamic Republic of Iran.

Mahsa Amini

Firouzeh Nordstrom

-Analysis-

TEHRAN — The death in Iran of a 22-year-old Mahsa Amini — after she was arrested by the so-called "morality police" — has unleashed another wave of protests, as thousands of Iranians vent their fury against an intrusive and violent regime. Indeed, as tragically exceptional as the circumstances appear, the reaction reflects the daily reality of abuse by authorities, especially directed toward women

Amini, a Kurdish-Iranian girl visiting Tehran with relatives, was detained by the regime's morality patrols on Sept. 13, apparently for not respecting the Islamic dress code that includes proper use of the hijab headscarf. Amini was declared dead two or three days after being taken into custody. Officials say she fainted and died, and blamed a preexisting heart condition. But neither her family nor anyone else in Iran believe that, as can be seen in the mounting protests that have now left at least three dead.

For Amini's was hardly the first arbitrary arrest, or the first suspected death in custody under Iran's Islamic regime.

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