When the world gets closer.

We help you see farther.

Sign up to our expressly international daily newsletter.

Enjoy unlimited access to quality journalism.

Limited time offer

Get your 30-day free trial!

DIE WELT (Germany)

Worldcrunch

HAMBURG – German researchers are developing a long-lasting battery that could solve one of the biggest problems of the energy transition, reports Die Welt.

The German government is aiming for electrical power in Germany to be 80% from renewable energy sources like wind and solar by the year 2050.

However, this energy transition can only be possible if the technology exists to get the energy from these sources onto the grid while maintaining grid stability. The way to do this is to create special batteries that can store the excess electricity created by wind and solar power to use during days when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing.

[rebelmouse-image 27086196 alt="""" original_size="500x375" expand=1]

Photo "Caveman Cuck" Coker

Four German universities, two research institutes and two companies are presently teamed up on a project to up the amount of energy from wind and solar power sources that can be stored by redox flow batteries and integrate it smoothly into the electricity grid.

The Federal Research Ministry is subsidizing the project to the tune of 5 million euros a year for the next five years.

The project, called "Tubulair" is coordinated out of Hamburg’s University of Applied Sciences. Other participating institutions include the University of Hamburg, institutions in Nuremberg and Aachen, FuMa Tech GmbH, and Uniwell GmbH & Co.

Redox flow battery technology was created by NASA in 1972, but has yet to break through to mass production. The Australians and the Japanese lead research in the field – they have both advanced to the stage of pilot projects – and China has been investing heavily in the technology for several years. The Germans lag behind.

“Tubulair” is not the only German project researching the technology – researchers at three Fraunhofer institutes are also pursuing the development of more efficient redox flow batteries.

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

Society

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Feeling overworked but not yet burned out? Often the problem is “burn-on,” an under-researched phenomenon whose sufferers desperately struggle to keep up and meet their own expectations — with dangerous consequences for their health.

Now They're Diagnosing Burnout's Never-Quit Cousin: Burn-On

Burn-out is the result of sustained periods of stress at work

Beate Strobel

At first glance, Mr L seems to be a successful man with a well-rounded life: middle management, happily married, father of two. If you ask him how he is, he responds with a smile and a “Fine thanks”. But everything is not fine. When he was admitted to the psychosomatic clinic Kloster Diessen, Mr L described his emotional life as hollow and empty.

Although outwardly he is still putting on a good face, he has been privately struggling for some time. Everything that used to bring him joy and fun has become simply another chore. He can hardly remember what it feels like to enjoy his life.

For psychotherapist Professor Bert te Wildt, who heads the psychosomatic clinic in Ammersee in Bavaria, Germany, the symptoms of Patient L. make him a prime example of a new and so far under-researched syndrome, that he calls “burn-on”. Working with psychologist Timo Schiele, he has published his findings about the phenomenon in a book, Burn-On.

Keep reading...Show less

You've reached your limit of free articles.

To read the full story, start your free trial today.

Get unlimited access. Cancel anytime.

Exclusive coverage from the world's top sources, in English for the first time.

Insights from the widest range of perspectives, languages and countries.

The latest

InterNations