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BUSINESS INSIDER

Scientists Calculate The Precise Chance The World Will End On Friday

NASA and others have chimed in on the likelihood of black holes, solar flares striking on Dec. 21.

Scientists Calculate The Precise Chance The World Will End On Friday

According to a Mayan calendar that's been widely misinterpreted, the world is supposed to end on Friday, December 21, 2012.

Doomsdayers think the world will end one of four ways:

  • -We'll be engulfed in a giant black hole
  • -The sun will pass through a "galactic plane"
  • -Solar flares will fry us
  • -A planet called Nibiru will collide with Earth

Scientists and historians say there's no way any of those will happen.

According to John Carlson, the Director of the Center of Archaeoastronomy, no Mayan calendar ever suggested the world would end on Friday. The Mayan calendar doesn't end in 2012 either. "The whole thing was a misconception from the very beginning," he tells The Atlantic.

The popular misconception stems from a long-count calendar the Mayans created to keep track of extended intervals of time. According to that calendar, the world was created on August 11, 3114 BC.

Like the odometer in a car, the numbers on the calendar can roll over, so number schemes that represent Mayan dates can repeat themselves.

On August 11, 3114 BC, the Mayan "odometer" looked like this: 13-0-0-0-0.

This Friday, it will look the same: 13-0-0-0-0.

While historians acknowledge that number scheme was significant to the Mayans, its arrival on 12/21/12 never meant the end of the world -- at least not as evidenced by ancient Mayan ruins or tableaus historians have found.

NASA

The sun is approaching a maxiumum of its 11-year activity cycle, but that doesn't mean solar flares will fry us on Friday

Scientists agree with historians: there's no evidence whatsoever that an unusual cosmic occurrence will occur this Friday. The head of NASA's near-earth object program, Dan Yeomans, hasn't seen any strange asteroids or planets headed toward Earth.

Another NASA scientist, David Morrison, confirms this. He says the government wouldn't be able to hide an object large enough to destroy Earth hurtling towards us in outer space. It'd be visible by now to everyone in the sky, and it would look like a very, very bright star.

"Just go outside and look," he suggests to anyone with a morsel of doubt.

Lika Guhathakurta leads NASA's star program, and she says the theory that solar flares will destroy earth on Friday are also false. It's true that the sun is approaching a solar maximum, but that happens every eleven years, and it poses no threat this Friday.

If you still aren't convinced, you can watch all of these experts explain why there is no, scientifically-plausible way the apocalypse will occur on Friday, below:



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Ideas

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Elon Musk bought Twitter in the name of absolute freedom. But numerous research shows that social media hate speech leads to actual violence. Musk and others running social networks need to strike a balance.

Absolute Free Speech Is A Recipe For Violence: Notes From Paris For Monsieur Musk

Freedom on social networks can result in insults and defamation

Jean-Marc Vittori

-Analysis-

PARIS — Elon Musk is the world's leading reckless driver. The ever unpredictable CEO of Tesla and SpaceX is now behind a very different wheel as the new head of Twitter.

He began by banning remote work before slightly backtracking and authorizing it for the company’s “significant contributors.” Now he’s opened the door to Donald Trump to return to Twitter, while at the same time vaunting a decrease in the number of hate-messages that appear on the social network…all while firing Twitter’s content moderation teams.

But this time, the world’s richest man will have to make choices. He’ll have to limit his otherwise unconditional love of free speech. “Freedom consists of being able to do everything that does not harm others,” proclaimed the French-born Declaration of the Rights of Man in 1789.

Yet freedom on social networks results not only in insults and defamation, but sometimes also in physical aggression.

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