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Sandy's Asian Sisters: Five Superstorms You May Have Missed

Worldcrunch

As Sandy pummels the United States, the Pacific typhoon season has been well underway on the other side of the world, resulting in some 500 deaths and $3.36 billion in total damages in Asia. Take a look at the five storms that you may have missed:

1. Typhoon Khanun
In mid-July, Typhoon Khanun swept over the Korean peninsula, killing 89 and causing $11.4 million in damages. Flooding left 63,000 homeless in North Korea, according to state news agencies.


2. Typhoon Saola and Typhoon Damrey
In early August, eastern China was staring down two powerful typhoons that caused 96 deaths and more than $700 million in damages.


3. Typhoon Haikui
Soon after Saola and Damrey, Typhoon Haikui came hurtling towards Shanghai, with winds exceeding 150kmh. Coastal infrastructure was decimated and 105 people died.


4.Typhoon Tembin and Typhoon Bolaven
In late August, Typhoon Tembin and Typhoon Bolaven ravaged the Pacific Asian nations with Bolaven killing 88 people, around 50 of which were in North Korea.


5. Typhoon Son-Thin
The worst may still not be over. At the time of Sandy, Typhoon Son-Thin was hurtling its way across the Philippine islands and headed towards Vietnam and China's southern coast, leaving 32 deaths in its wake. The typhoon has left thousands stranded.

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Economy

How Fleeing Russians (And Their Rubles) Are Shaking Up Neighboring Economies

Russians fled the war to neighboring countries, bringing with them billions of dollars worth of wealth. The influx of money is both a windfall and a problem.

How Fleeing Russians (And Their Rubles) Are Shaking Up Neighboring Economies

January 2023, Saint Petersburg, Russia. Sberbank logo seen on a residential building during the sanctions against Russian banks

Maksim Konstantinov / SOPA Images via ZUMA Press Wire
Important Stories

Posting a comment on a Kazakhstani real estate listing and sales website this past fall, one user couldn't contain his enthusiasm: "It's unbelievable, hasn't happened since 2013 — the market has exploded! ... Yippee! I don't know who to kiss!"

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The boom of demand — and dollars — in Kazakhstan, and other countries in the region, is traced directly to the incoming Russians and their wealth who have arrived since the war in Ukraine began.

The ongoing wave of fleeing Russians is likely the largest emigration from the country in 100 years. There are no accurate estimates of how many Russians have left the country, much less where they will settle or how many of them will eventually return home. But between March and October, up to 1.5 million people left Russia. A conservative estimate suggests half a million haven't returned.

The main flow passed through Georgia, Armenia, Kyrgyzstan, Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan (which has the longest land border with Russia). In these countries, the Russian language is widespread and visas are unnecessary. Russians can even enter Kazakhstan and Armenia without a passport.

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