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Russia

Russia Says Siberian Meteor Field Contains "Trillions Of Carats" Of Diamonds

ITAR-TASS (Russia), CHRISTIAN SCIENCE MONITOR

Worldcrunch

MOSCOW – The Kremlin has authorized scientists to finally reveal what they say are “trillions of carats” of diamonds located in a field in eastern Siberia that could forever change the market of the precious gem.

The Russians have know since the 1970s of this 35-million-year-old and 62-mile wide meteor site known as Poigai, but have kept it a secret in an effort to control the market fed by their other mines and production of artificial diamonds.


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A Siberian diamond mine (Stepanova)

Different than the diamonds that typically make it onto engagement rings, these come from the high-speed impact of an asteroid with graphite deposit, making them “twice as hard” and well-suited for industry, according to ITAR-TASS.

This specific feature of the stones “expands significantly the scope of their industrial use and makes them more valuable for industrial purposes,” Nikolai Pokhilenko, director of Novosibirsk Institute of Geology and Mineralogy Director, explained last week to ITAR-TASS.

With production innovation, the resource will become more and more important in advanced scientific fields, notes the Christian Science Monitor.

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Society

Parenthood And The Pressure Of Always Having To Be Doing Better

As a father myself, I'm now better able to understand the pressures my own dad faced. It's helped me face my own internal demands to constantly be more productive and do better.

Photo of a father with a son on his shoulders

Father and son in the streets of Madrid, Spain

Ignacio Pereyra*

-Essay-

When I was a child — I must have been around eight or so — whenever we headed with my mom and grandma to my aunt's country house in Don Torcuato, outside of Buenos Aires, there was the joy of summer plans. Spending the day outdoors, playing soccer in the field, being in the swimming pool and eating delicious food.

But when I focus on the moment, something like a painful thorn appears in the background: from the back window of the car I see my dad standing on the sidewalk waving us goodbye. Sometimes he would stay at home. “I have to work” was the line he used.

Maybe one of my older siblings would also stay behind with him, but I'm sure there were no children left around because we were all enthusiastic about going to my aunt’s. For a long time in his life, for my old man, those summer days must have been the closest he came to being alone, in silence (which he liked so much) and in calm, considering that he was the father of seven. But I can only see this and say it out loud today.

Over the years, the scene repeated itself: the destination changed — it could be a birthday or a family reunion. The thorn was no longer invisible but began to be uncomfortable as, being older, my interpretation of the events changed. When words were absent, I started to guess what might be happening — and we know how random guessing can be.

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