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Print Me A Liver: France Claims World's First Laser 3D Bioprinter

Printing the human body
Printing the human body
Marie Vaton

PARIS — The 3D printing revolution promises to change the very way products are manufactured and sold, across a vast array of sectors. Inevitably this has sparked a race to directly print living cells of human beings. This technology is now available in the US and Japan, dubbed 3D bioprinting, with wide-eyed investors flocking to the market.

Now a French company, led by Fabien Guillemot, has recently developed the first laser 3D bioprinter in the world. "Before our discovery, the 3D bioprinter ran mostly on living ink. Using a laser permits to obtain higher concentrated cell inks which improve the cells communication."

The researcher admits that for the moment he is not able to bio-print an entire arm. "In vitro, we made pieces of human skin and cornea. In vivo, we printed pieces of bones on a living mouse. For now, the most interesting according to the pharmaceutical laboratories is to use print pieces of human skins to test new molecules. It could sign the end of the animal experimentations."

In the future, 3D bioprinting could revolutionize the medical world by allowing a totally individualized medicine based on the genetic heritage of each patient. That technology could allow for example, the production of artificial transplants and decrease the risk of graft rejection.

In this following video, Christopher Barnatt, an associate professor of strategy and future studies at Nottingham University Business School explains how 3D bioprinting could change our lives.


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Society

Tour Of Istanbul's Ancient Yedikule Gardens, At Risk With Urban Restoration

The six-hectare gardens in the center of Istanbul, which are more than 1,500 years old, have helped feed the city's residents over the centuries and are connected with its religious history. But current city management has a restoration project that could disrupt a unique urban ecosystem.

Photo of Muslims performing Friday prayer in the garden of Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul.

Last March, Muslims performing Friday prayer in the garden of Suleymaniye Mosque, Istanbul.

Tolga Ildun via ZUMA Press Wire
Canan Coşkun

ISTANBUL — The historic urban gardens of Yedikule in Istanbul are at risk of destruction once again. After damage in 2013 caused by the neighborhood municipality of Fatih, the gardens are now facing further disruption and possible damage as the greater Istanbul municipality plans more "restoration" work.

The six-hectare gardens are more than 1,500 years old, dating back to the city's Byzantine era. They were first farmed by Greeks and Albanians, then people from the northern city of Kastamonu, near the Black Sea. Now, a wide variety of seasonal produce grows in the garden, including herbs, varieties of lettuce and other greens, red turnip, green onion, cabbage, cauliflower, tomato, pepper, corn, mullberry, fig and pomegranate.

Yedikule is unique among urban gardens around the world, says Cemal Kafadar, a historian and professor of Turkish Studies at Harvard University.

“There are (urban gardens) that are older than Istanbul gardens, such as those in Rome, but there is no other that has maintained continuity all this time with its techniques and specific craft," Kafadar says. "What makes Yedikule unique is that it still provides crops. You might have eaten (from these gardens) with or without knowing about it."

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