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Planet Earth Mourns First Man On Moon: World Reacts To Neil Armstrong's Death


PARIS - Neil Armstrong has died at the age of 82. The American astronaut was not only the pride of the U.S. space program, he was the first earthling to touch the planet's only moon. As such, the whole world -- or at least its major press outlets -- reacted largely in unison to Armstrong's death. Here is a small sampling of the global coverage:
DIE WELT (Germany)
LIBERATION (France)
ASAHI SHIMBUN (Japan)
FOLHA DE S. PAULO (Brazil)

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

Yes, Navalny Still Matters — But Putin's Opposition Can't Fix Russia Now

Two years ago, Vladimir Putin's most prominent critic Alexei Navalny was jailed. Much has and hasn't changed since then, but Putin's invasion of Ukraine means that Russia has put itself on a course of no return.

photo of a guard in a moscow court as Alexei Navalny appears by video link

In May, a video link of Alexei Navalny from Pokrov's Penal Colony No 2 as the Moscow City Court for an appeal hearing on his case.

Sergei Karpukhin/TASS via ZUMA
Cameron Manley

-Analysis-

It was exactly two years ago, when leading Russian opposition figure Alexei Navalny was finally in good enough health to fly home from Germany to Moscow. But he knew the risks.

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“Russia is my home,” he said before leaving. “I want to go back and try to change it.”

Landing on the tarmac, five months after he was nearly assassinated by a nerve agent, he embraced his wife. They walked to passport control, followed by hordes of eager journalists.

The border guard carefully scrutinized Navalny’s passport, looking at his face, at his passport — again, his face, his passport. He called over his superiors, who did the same. “You need to come with us,” they told him.

His lawyer protested, exclaiming that she should be allowed to accompany him. But in Vladimir Putin’s Russia, then as now, there is no use in protesting.

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