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New EU-Funded "Super Internet" Project Launches In Dublin

TECH CENTRAL, IRISH INDEPENDENT (Ireland), LA STAMPA (Italy)

Worldcrunch

DUBLIN - The European Union is banking on broadband.

More than eight million euros in EU funding have been awarded to a project that promises to “revolutionize” broadband in Europe. According to Tech Central, the DISCUS project aims to address issues at the heart of the fiber-optic broadband provision: the growing demand for services like high-definition video streaming and gaming.

A three-year project based in Trinity College in Dublin, DISCUS will bring together 13 industry and academic partners from Ireland, Belgium, Germany, Spain, Italy, UK, Sweden and France. La Stampa says the head of the project is Italian Marco Ruffini, who wants to change broadband forever.

The project will explore "new ways" to use fiber optics to build what it calls a "simplified broadband network that will provide ultra-high speed internet" says the Irish Independent.

On the DISCUS official site, Irish Minister for Communication Pat Rabbitte is quoted as saying: "Strengthening Europe’s digital economy by advancing areas such as a high speed broadband rollout is a priority for the Irish Presidency of the EU. This pan European telecommunications project led by our own researchers here at CTVR at Trinity will provide concrete results for the benefit of both Ireland and Europe and demonstrates the critical links between research and enterprise that lead ultimately to jobs creation."

But why is this project important? It demonstrates how the EU can contribute to research, as well as illustrating how it is good to put more money into the EU budget, rather than less says La Stampa.

The total investment in this project is 11.7 million euros, of which 8.1 million euros has been contributed by the EU. The remainder has been provided by other partners, including Telecom Italia and Nokia.

L-R Head of CTVR, Professor Linda Doyle; TCD Provost, Dr Patrick Prendergast; Minister for Communications, Energy and Natural Resources, Pat Rabbitte; CTVR lead academic of the project, Dr Marco Ruffini

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Geopolitics

Utter Pessimism, What Israelis And Palestinians Share In Common

Right now, according to a joint survey of Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for a peaceful solution of coexistence simply don't exist. The recent spate of violence is confirmation of the deepest kind of pessimism on both sides for any solution other than domination of the other.

An old Palestinian protester waves Palestinian flag while he confronts the Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the village of Beit Dajan near the West Bank city of Nablus.

A Palestinian protester confronts Israeli soldiers during the demonstration against Israeli settlements in the West Bank village of Beit Dajan on Jan. 6.

Pierre Haski

-Analysis-

PARIS — Just before the latest outbreak of violence between Israelis and Palestinians, a survey of public opinion among the two peoples provided a key to understanding the current situation unfolding before our eyes.

It was a joint study, entitled "Palestinian-Israeli Pulse", carried out by two research centers, one Israeli, the other Palestinian, which for years have been regularly asking the same questions to both sides.

The result is disastrous: not only is the support for the two-state solution — Israel and Palestine side by side — at its lowest point in two decades, but there is now a significant share of opinion on both sides that favors a "non-democratic" solution, i.e., a single state controlled by either the Israelis or Palestinians.

This captures the absolute sense of pessimism commonly felt regarding the chances of the two-state option ever being realized, which currently appears to be our grim reality today. But the results are also an expression of the growing acceptance on both sides that it is inconceivable for either state to live without dominating the other — and therefore impossible to live in peace.

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