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LA NACION,CLARIN, BUENOSAIRESBACHE (ARGENTINA)

Worldcrunch

BUENOS AIRES - Driving through Buenos Aires can resemble scenes from Mad expand=1] Max. Not only must you dodge reckless drivers, but also steer clear of the multitudes of potholes. According to La Nacion, in the most populous neighborhoods of Buenos Aires such as Belgrano, there are potholes on virtually every block.

The one on the corner of Lavalle Street, says the newspaper, looks like a “crater,” measuring one square meter wide and one meter deep. Cars have reportedly fallen in this pothole, especially during the rainy season.

But Buenos Aires drivers are finally getting some help in avoiding the city’s giant potholes. Diego Kravetz, a former Buenos Aires legislator has launched a new website to help drivers navigate the city safely, but also to shame the city government into repairing the roads, and addressing the issue.

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(Infrogmation)

According to Clarin, a few hours after the website was launched, 1,656 potholes had already been registered on the website – www.buenosairesbache.com. The site lists the potholes by category, that is size and shape -- And here's where the snark begins.

Some 44% of the potholes were listed under the category “a cow could fall in;” 41% were the size “a soccer ball could fall in;” 6% the size “a public bus ("bondi") could fall in;” another 6% were “like a cliff.”

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