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TOPIC: war in ukraine

In The News

Zelensky At G20, China COVID Riots, 8 Billion Humans

👋 Grüezi!*

Welcome to Tuesday, where Ukraine is the focus as G20 meeting kicks off in Bali, protests against COVID restrictions turn violent in China, and human population crosses the 8-billion threshold. And hold that green smoothie: for German daily Die Welt, alternative medicine specialist Edzard Ernst dispels misconceptions about all things detox.

[*Swiss German]

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Could India Be The Ukraine-Russia Mediator The World Needs?

New Delhi has the ability and diplomatic space to lead an effort to halt the conflict. But timing is everything.

-Analysis-

NEW DELHI — Let's look at several recent developments: Narendra Modi’s rebuke of Russia at the SCO summit in Samarkand, Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar’s visit to Moscow, a Washington Post story saying the U.S. was pushing Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelensky to be open to negotiations with Russia. Taken together, these and other factors have triggered speculation that New Delhi could possibly play the role of peacemaker in the Ukraine war.

Does India have the necessary heft and stamina to take up the task?

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For the record, speaking at a Hindustan Times event on Thursday, Jaishankar has said that it would be “premature” to speak of India acting as a mediator to make peace between Russia and Ukraine. Note that he did not reject the notion.

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Zelensky In Kherson, Xi And Biden Meet, Paris Olympics Mascots

👋 Bula!*

Welcome to Monday, where Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky is in Kherson after it was recaptured from Russian forces, suspects are arrested after an Istanbul blast kills eight, and the mascots for the 2024 Paris Olympics are … walking hats. Meanwhile, for Romanian magazine DoR, Oana Sandu focuses on the long-lasting impact witnessing domestic violence has on children.

[*Fijian]

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COP27 Hunger Strike, U.S.-Russia Talks, Record Lottery Jackpot

👋 Håfa adai!*

Welcome to Monday, where a newspaper report says the top U.S. security official has had a secret channel open with Moscow to ease risk of nuclear attacks, a COP 27 hunger strike aims at the Cairo regime and a lottery prize sets a record. Meanwhile, we’ve gathered some international coverage of the campaign for the U.S. midterm elections (which happen tomorrow).

[*Chamorro - Guam]

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Johannes Jauhiainen

Tensions In Norway Border Town, A Perfect Kremlin Recipe To Divide The West

In a remote region of Norway, a tense standoff is taking place between a tiny town and its giant neighbor to the east, Russia. The Kremlin is accused of using the area as as a staging ground for its policies to divide the West.

Russia's invasion of Ukraine has led to its most tense relations with the West since the Cold War, playing out in the halls of international diplomacy and the global movement of arms and energy supplies. But the showdown is also alive on more local settings, most recently pitting Norway's remote northeastern region of Finnmark against its giant neighbor to the east.

The latest escalation in a series of events occurred last Saturday when Russian Consul General Nikolai Konygin was set to give a speech in the small town of Kirkenes to commemorate the Red Army’s liberation of the town from Nazi Germany and their Norwegian collaborators.

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Konygin, who was accompanied by visitors the Russian border city of Nikel, was met with Norwegian protesters who turned their back on the Consul General during the speech and began waving Ukrainian flags. The scene looked like a miniature battlefield as the Russian entourage remained facing the consul general while waving Russian flags.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Anna Akage

Why Iran Has Decided To Arm Russia, And The Price To Pay

After months of trading barbs with Ukraine's allies in the West, Tehran is now fully engaged alongside Moscow in the conflict, most notably with supplies of so-called Kamikaze drones. Although the fact that Iran still denies its activities is a sign that the partnership is loaded.

-Analysis-

In Ukraine, they’ve been nicknamed “mopeds” for the sound of their motors as they terrorize from the air. The Shahed-136 kamikaze drones striking Kyiv, Lviv, Dnipro, and Odessa are also the most visible sign that Iran has officially entered the war in Ukraine as an active military partner for Russia.

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These drones, which have a range of more than 1,000 kilometers, are being launched from Crimea and Voronezh in southwestern Russia. They cost far less than missiles, and although they don't have the same destructive power, they can kill humans and disable critical infrastructure at any moment on any street in any Ukrainian city.

U.S. intelligence, which had warned this past summer that Russian President Vladimir Putin was set to buy a large batch of drones, are now reporting that Iran is also planning to sell ground-to-ground ballistic missiles to Moscow. On top of this, there are multiple reports that Iran is sending military advisors to train Russians to use their weapons.

After limiting itself in the first months of the war to rhetorical barbs aimed at Ukraine’s allies in the West, the past two weeks have thus seen a major escalation of Tehran’s role alongside Moscow.

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Vladimir Solovyov

Belarus To Kazakhstan: Russia's Weakness Is A Powder Keg In Ex-Soviet Lands

Russia has always claimed to be a kind of sheriff on the territory of the former USSR, a zone the country considers as its "privileged interests." Now it has lost both strength and authority in the war with Ukraine.

Since the collapse of the USSR, thirty years ago, the post-Soviet regions regularly brought bad news to the world. This included everything from regional conflicts and civil wars to ethnic clashes and military coups. But until recently, this never had merged into one continuous stream.

In 2020 we began to see how the instability and simmering conflicts could converge and take a bloody turn: Hostilities resumed between Armenia and Azerbaijan, Belarus bubbling, with popular protests against strongman Alexander Lukashenko, border skirmishes turned deadly between Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan; another coup d'état took place in Kyrgyzstan in October.

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Fast-forward to today: We are seeing how Russia's war with Ukraine has worsened the region's security.

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In The News
Newsletter by Anne-Sophie Goninet, Bertrand Hauger And Sophia Constantino

Russian Plane Crash, Truss To Keep Calm And Stick Around, Indian Chess Prodigy

👋 ꦲꦭꦺꦴ*

Welcome to Tuesday, where 13 are killed as a Russian training flight crashes in Russia, embattled Liz Truss vows to “stick around,” and an Indian teenager beats chess grandmaster Magnus Carlsen. Meanwhile, Pavel Lysyansky in Ukrainian media Livy Bereg explores a 1990s treaty that may give us an idea about Putin’s “USSR 2.0” ambitions.

[*Halo - Javanese, Indonesia]

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In The News
Newsletter by Anne-Sophie Goninet, Laure Gautherin And Sophia Constantino

New Monday Morning Assault On Ukraine Cities, Nigeria Floods Toll At 600, Billions Of Crabs Vanish

👋 Hej!*

Welcome to Monday, where Kyiv and other Ukrainian cities wake up under air strikes for the second consecutive week, Xi Jinping gives no ground at China’s Communist Party Congress and seven billion crabs have gone missing. Meanwhile, Christoph B. Schiltz in German daily Die Welt says it would be a mistake to think Putin is cornered, noting four distinct options he has to try to regain the upper hand in Ukraine.

[*Swedish]

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Russia
Christoph B. Schiltz

Here Are Four Ways Putin Could Turn The Tide In Ukraine

Ukraine's recent successes on the battlefield have put pressure on Vladimir Putin, who has launched what appear to be desperate attacks on civilians and infrastructure in response. Experts warn that it is dangerous to believe that Russia is bound to fail.

-Analysis-

Russia's airstrikes on Ukraine have continued unabated throughout the week.

More than 40 cities have been hit by Russian missiles over a period of just 24 hours, the General Staff of the Ukrainian army announced Thursday. Heavy strikes occurred in the outskirts of Kyiv for several nights in a row. Sirens wailed, people ran in panic through the darkness.

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Thirty percent of the country's energy infrastructure has now been destroyed, according to Ukrainian figures — a dramatic development as rain and cold weather are just around the corner.

Ukraine needs to urgently "defend itself against the terrible Russian attacks on civilians," NATO chief Jens Stoltenberg told the alliance's defense ministers meeting in Brussels earlier this week. The message got through.

Germany and the U.S. made new commitments to supply air defense, and a total of 15 countries signed a declaration of intent for a "European Sky Shield" in Brussels on Thursday. The goal is to "close the gaps" in air defense, said Defense Minister Christine Lambrecht.

But to be clear, as brutal as they are, the Russian missile offensives are the direct result of Ukraine's huge military gains in recent weeks.

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In The News
Cameron Manley, Sophia Constantino, Bertrand Hauger, Anne-Sophie Goninet and Jeff Israely

Six Hundred And Counting — Russia Losing Ground, Town By Town

Russia has begun evacuating pro-Moscow residents in the Kherson region after a Russian official in the partially occupied area said residents should leave for their own safety.

Ukraine’s armed forces have retaken more than 600 localities under Russian occupation in the past month, including 75 in the strategic Kherson region, Ukraine's Ministry for Reintegration of the Temporary Occupied Territories said.

The ministry said 502 towns and villages have been liberated in the northeast Kharkiv region, 43 in the Donetsk region and seven in the Luhansk region.

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"The area of liberated Ukrainian territories has increased significantly," the ministry said in a statement on its website.

In perhaps another show of its weakened hold on recently occupied territories, Russia has begun evacuating pro-Moscow residents in the Kherson region after a Russian official in the partially occupied area said residents should leave for their own safety.

Russia’s TASS news agency reported a first group of civilians from Kherson was expected to land in Russia’s Rostov region as soon as Friday, while more will move to Crimea.

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In The News
Newsletter by Anne-Sophie Goninet, Laure Gautherin, Sophia Constantino and Bertrand Hauger

Russia To Evacuate Kherson, Capitol Riot Hearing, Denim Archeology

👋 გამარჯობა*

Welcome to Friday, where Ukraine keeps regaining territory, Trump gets subpoenaed as part of Capitol riots hearing, and you may want to hold onto your vintage Levi’s for a little while longer. And in Kyiv-based Livy Bereg, Alina Grytsenko looks at how, pushed by Putin’s nuclear threat, several nations have recently been looking to acquire a nuclear arsenal for national security.

[*Gamarjoba - Georgian]

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