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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War

"Welcome To Our Hell..." Ukrainian Foreign Minister Dmytro Kuleba Speaks

In a rare in-depth interview, Ukraine's top diplomat didn't hold back as he discussed NATO, EU candidacy, and the future of the war with Russia. He also reserves a special "thank you" for Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi.

KYIV — This is the first major interview Ukrainian Minister of Foreign Affairs Dmytro Kuleba has given. He spoke to the Ukrainian publication Livy Bereg about NATO, international assistance and confrontation with Russia — on the frontline and in the offices of the European Parliament.

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At 41, Kuleba is the youngest ever foreign minister of Ukraine. He is the former head of the Commission for Coordination of Euro-Atlantic Integration and initiated Ukraine's accession to the European Green Deal. The young but influential pro-European politician is now playing a complicated political game in order to attract as many foreign partners as possible to support Ukraine not only in the war, but also when the war ends.

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Anna's Visit, From Avignon To Kyiv And Back

July 2-3

  • Defending Ukraine’s “hero city”
  • Anti-abortion momentum spreads
  • Bunk-bed flights
  • … and much more.
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When Mom Believes Putin: A Russian Family Torn Apart Over Ukraine Invasion

Sisters Rante and Satu Vodich fled Russia because they could no longer bear to live under Putin — but their mother believes state propaganda about the war. Her daughters are building a new life for themselves in Georgia.

TBILISI — On a gloomy afternoon in May, Rante Vodich gets the keys to her new home. A week earlier, the 27-year-old found this wooden shed in Tbilisi, with a corrugated iron roof and ramshackle bathroom. The shed next door houses an old bed covered in dust. Vodich refers to the place as a “studio” and pays $300 per month in rent. She says finding the studio is the best thing that’s happened to her since she came to Georgia. It is her hope for the future.

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Her younger sister Satu Vodich is around 400 kilometers further west, in the city of Batumi on Georgia’s Black Sea coast, surrounded by Russian tourists, Ukrainian flags, skyscrapers with sea views and the run-down homes of local residents.

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Special Sauce To Sriracha, Globalization Is Thriving And Terribly Broken

June 25-26

  • A foreigner’s view on U.S. gun culture
  • Scholz, at home and abroad
  • A environmentally-minded robo-fish
  • … and much more.
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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Dominique Moïsi

To "Not Humiliate" Putin Is The Real Danger

French President Emmanuel Macron is making a point of keeping an open dialogue with Putin, hoping to avoid a world war at all costs. But he needs to get his historical comparisons (and world wars) in order.

-Analysis-

PARIS — “I know Putin well. We should not be hoping for him to leave: whoever is likely to succeed him will be much worse.”

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This is what former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger said to me in 2017, while we were in New York. He was trying to moderate my growing hostility towards the Kremlin’s leader. In fact, in the same sentence, he wanted to also reassure me about the United States President Donald Trump, who had just come into the room: “He may be unpredictable, but he is not an ideologue.”

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FOCUS: Russia-Ukraine War
Maryna Dadinova

Google Search Or SciFi Time Travel? Why Post-War Ukraine Must Begin Now

Why has Russia invaded Ukraine? Internet readers want to know. What will Ukraine be like after the war? That's a question to start answering, even if the battle is far from over.

-Analysis-

KYIV — During the first week of the war in Ukraine, the most frequently searched question on Google was, “Why did Russia invade Ukraine?" In response, a team of Ukrainian communications experts hoping to answer this question posted a large red ‘Why’ button on the official ‘War in Ukraine’ homepage, directing readers to an explanation of Russia’s ideological rationale for invading Ukraine.

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Last week, "cholera" and "Peter I" appeared among the top Google search queries linked to Ukraine. The reasons for each are easy to explain. For the first, outbreaks of contagious diseases, including cholera, have been reported in the occupied city of Mariupol. The city itself is deprived of access to clean drinking water and has no access to hospitals and doctors who specialize in infectious diseases.

And the second?

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In The News
Lila Paulou, McKenna Johnson, Joel Silvestri and Lisa Berdet

Ukraine War To “Intensify,” Former Guerrilla Wins Colombian Presidency, Open Buffett

👋 Здраво!*

Welcome to Monday, where Ukraine braces for intensified Russian attacks, there are major election results in Colombia and France, and someone is prepared to pay a whole lot of money to share a meal with Warren Buffett. Meanwhile, French finance daily Les Echos looks up at the repercussions of the Ukraine war — in space.

[*Zdravo - Serbian]

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Ideas
Tomáš Kafka*

When The Age Of Compromise Gave Way To A Time Of Heroism

We know them from the movies: the heroes who save the world from disaster in the nick of time. In real life, you sometimes look for them in vain. But the Russian invasion of Ukraine shows that the West needs new heroes.

-OpEd-

BERLIN — In recent times, we speak more and more frequently about the end of globalization or even the beginning of de-globalization. The world in which the will to compromise and where unity prevailed unfortunately has definitively come to an end. It was February 24, and the unprovoked Russian act of war awakened us to a world dominated by conflict.

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In order for the West — for us — to be able to cope with this reality, it is essential that we not only accept this notion, which is unpleasant for some, but that we also understand that with the era of globalization, another great era is also coming to an end: the era where heroes are not required.

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In The News

Le Weekend ➡️ History In The Making? A Photo Op À Trois On The Way To Kyiv

June 18-19

  • Rethinking Europe
  • Murder investigation in the Amazon
  • Australia’s dancing goalie
  • … and much more.
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Society
Pavel Lokshin

The Return Of Groupthink In Russian Classrooms

For years, Vladimir Putin’s regime has been pushing its agenda into schools. With the start of the invasion of Ukraine, the pressure on the education system has intensified on a massive scale. Here's a peek inside the means of control over students' minds.

MOSCOW — In Vladimir Putin’s Russia, even a 12-year-old can become a dissident. That’s what happened to one Moscow sixth-grader named Kirill. During a history lesson in early March, he asked his teacher why Putin started the war and when it would end.

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It would end with the surrender of Ukraine, the teacher said, because fascism ruled in Kyiv. Kirill expressed doubts about the response; and a few days later, police officers knocked on the family’s apartment door to issue a summons. The case was reported by independent Russian newspaper Novaya Gazeta.

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In The News
McKenna Johnson, Joel Silvestri, Lila Paulou, Lisa Berdet and Bertrand Hauger.

Amnesty Denounces Russian War Crimes, U.S. Gun Reform Progress, Man Outruns Horse

👋 Buongiorno!*

Welcome to Monday, where an Amnesty International report details Russian war crimes in the Ukrainian city of Kharkiv, gun reforms gain bipartisan support in the U.S. and an aptly-named man runs faster than horses. Meanwhile, Melilla-based, Spanish-language daily El Faro de Melilla explores how a new generation of Muslim women is managing to navigate both misogyny and Islamophobia to create its own space.

[*Italian]

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