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TOPIC: photojournalism

OneShot

Photo Of The Week: This Happened In Bucha

We have chosen a single image to tell the story of what happened in Bucha, Ukraine, though there are many others worth looking at. We bear witness to face the present reality, and help document for posterity and war crimes trials that the world now demands.

Once Russian troops retreated from Bucha, reports arrived this weekend that the suburban town north of Kyiv had been the scene of possible war crimes: civilians killed, raped and deprived of food and water.

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Among the first journalists to arrive was a crew from Agence France-Presse, including award-winning Venezuelan-born photographer Ronaldo Schemidt.

His images and those of other photographers — along with testimony gathered by multiple independent reporters from survivors and witnesses — would confirm many of the world's worst fears about bloodletting by Russian forces: bodies strewn on the street of people in ordinary clothes, shot down alongside their bicycles, outside their homes; others buried in hastily dug mass graves.

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Acclaimed Ukrainian Photographer Maks Levin Hasn’t Been Seen Since March 13

The veteran photojournalist was covering the Russian invasion north of Kyiv, after spending years chronicling Ukraine’s longstanding battles in its eastern regions against pro-Russian separatists.

Maks Levin, a leading Ukrainian combat photographer and documentary filmmaker, has disappeared while covering the war north of Kyiv. Levin, 41, last made contact on March 13 while working in an active combat zone.

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It later became known that in the area where Levin was working, intense combat operations began, and colleagues fear he may have been injured or captured by Russian troops.

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Watch: OneShot — Praying For A Miracle

Hellen lives with a mental health condition in Juba, South Sudan. She says she fell ill after the birth of her sixth child.

With this powerful portrait, New-Zealand born photojournalist Robin Hammond won 2017 second prize singles at the prestigious World Press Photo, in the "People" category.

In this OneShot, Hammond explains why he thinks this particular image of Hellen touched the jury.

Praying for a Miracle (©Robin Hammond/NOOR) | OneShot

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Watch: OneShot — Reza's Breath Of Freedom

It is one of the most iconic images taken by Iranian-French photojournalist Reza. For nearly four decades, Reza has spanned the globe covering conflict and communities, stories of faith and visions of beauty. This image capturing the eternal spirit of the nomad along the plains of Turkmenistan is now available for purchase as a print in Reza's ongoing end-of-the-year Flash Sale. Discover the story below of this passing moment in moving words and images via One Shot.

Breath Of Freedom (© Reza) | OneShot

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Watch — OneShot: The Story Of Dorothea Lange's Migrant Mother

It may be the most iconic photograph of the Great Depression. Dorothea Lange's 1936 image has come to be known as Migrant Mother, though the Library of Congress references its full title as Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age thirty-two. Nipomo, California.

OneShot gives life to the story behind this seminal photograph from recollections Lange offered in an interview years later.

Migrant Mother — (© Dorothea Lange | OneShot)

A selection of Dorothea Lange's works is currently on display at the Jeu de Paume musem in Paris. The exhibition, entitled The Politics of Seeing focuses on five series: the "Depression period" (1933-1934), the "Farm Security Administration" (1935-1939), the "Japanese American internment" (1942), the "Richmond shipyards' (1942-1944) and a "Public defender" (1955-1957).

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Watch: OneShot — Fisherman Eye In Rio

With her Alibi series, Brazilian artist Alice Quaresma is pushing the boundaries of photography. Incorporating collage-like geometrical shapes into her images, she disrupts the traditional rigidity of static ocean views, and creates a playful, interactive journey somewhere between painting and photography.

Fisherman Eye — © Alice Quaresma / OneShot

Alice Quaresma's work was recently displayed at the seventh edition of UNSEEN Amsterdam. UNSEEN is now an all-year-round leading platform for contemporary photography.

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Watch: OneShot — Bully In The Mirror

With Bully Pulpit, U.S.-born artist Haley Morris-Cafiero offers a parodic comment on the phenomenon of bullying in the age of social media. Finding photographs of her harassers on the internet, Morris-Cafiero then used cheap prosthetics to disguise herself as her bully, thus sparking a reflection on identity and online anonymity.

Morris-Cafiero's work was recently displayed at the seventh edition of UNSEEN Amsterdam. UNSEEN is an all-year-round leading platform for contemporary photography.

Bully In The Mirror — © Haley Morris-Cafiero / OneShot

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Peru

Watch: OneShot — Chronic Kidney Disease And A Grieving Mother

This last instalment of our three-part OneShot series, tells the story of Santos Felipa, who lost her son last year to Chronic Kidney Disease of undetermined causes (CKDu). Photojournalist and National Geographic storyteller Ed Kashi has traveled to rural Peru to document the effects of CKDu, which risks turning into a global epidemic and may be exacerbated by global warming.

Santos Felipa — ©Ed Kashi/OneShot

On the coast of Talara, Peru, Kashi met Santos Felipa Abad de Arismendis, a 57-year-old woman whose 33-year-old son Frank died from CKDu. Frank had to travel to Piura for his dialysis treatments — three hours away. During one trip, the rain was so heavy that the road was impassable, and Frank was unable to receive dialysis.

Watch Part I, Giving Voice To Kidney Disease Victims In Peru.

Watch Part II, Mary, When A Whole Family Faces Illness.

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Peru

Watch: OneShot — Mary, When A Whole Family Faces Illness

Photojournalist and National Geographic storyteller Ed Kashi has traveled to rural Peru to document the effects of Chronic Kidney Disease of undetermined causes (CKDu), which risks turning into a global epidemic and may be exacerbated by global warming. With this series of OneShot videos, we give voice for the first time to the subject of the featured photograph. Mary Marixa Pacherres Álvarez was diagnosed with CKDu eight years ago, and has been on dialysis ever since. She is raising four kids in the same house with her parents. Her 13-year-old daughter stopped going to school in order to care for her.

Mary — ©Ed Kashi/OneShot

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Italy

Watch: OneShot, A Ghost Town After Expulsion Of Immigrants

As nationalism and anti-immigration campaigns shake and split Europe, photojournalist Tommaso Bonaventura went last winter to a small village in southern Italy where immigrants had given new life to the town emptied of its young inhabitants seeking jobs elsewhere. But last year, the mayor decided to close the immigrants' residence, forcing them to leave the town of Ripabottoni. What happened next may come as a surprise: a popular revolt against the mayor was launched as residents realized that the migrants may have been the village's last chance at rebirth.

Il Bar — ©Tommaso Bonaventura/OneShot

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Peru
Ed Kashi

Watch: OneShot, Giving Voice To Kidney Disease Victims In Peru

Photojournalist and National Geographic storyteller Ed Kashi has traveled to rural Peru to document the effects of Chronic Kidney Disease of undetermined causes (CKDu), which risks turning into a global epidemic and may be exacerbated by global warming. Raphael Diaz, 53, lives in Sullana with his wife and two kids. For more than five years, Diaz, has spent three days per week on dialysis after being diagnosed with CKDu. With this series of OneShot videos, we give voice for the first time to the subject of the featured photograph.

Raphael Diaz — ©Ed Kashi/OneShot

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Laure Gautherin

Watch: OneShot, Rohingya Ethnic Cleansing Began One Year Ago

Saturday marks exactly one year since the Myanmar military began to force the Rohingya out of the Rakhine state in what a top United Nations official later called "a textbook example of ethnic cleansing." At least 700,000 people fled, mostly to neighboring Bangladesh, as efforts to repatriate the Muslim minority to Myanmar continue to stall.

Here is a OneShot video of one of the most dramatic images of Rohingya fleeing for their lives...

Photo: Richard Tsong-Taatarii/ZUMA

Earlier this week, Aung San Suu Kyi — a 1991 Nobel Peace Prize winner and de facto leader of Myanmar — continued to treat the issue as a security and diplomatic issue, insisting that there was no specific ethnicity that was targeted. "We, who are living through the transition in Myanmar, view it differently than those who observe it from the outside and who will remain untouched by its outcome," she said.

Meanwhile, new stories of Rohingya being raped and killed and families being separated continue to surface. Many have called for Suu Kyi's Nobel Peace Prize to be revoked — which is highly unlikely — though recently she was stripped of Scotland's Freedom of Edinburgh award.

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